Trend Research Centre


1000 CLUB OF THE ADSORPTION

Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) --1900-present

There were 47,868,069 publications which included 33,150,765 articles in the SCI-EXPANDED from 1900

“Adsorption”, “sorption”, and “biosorption” were used as the keyword to search titles, abstracts, keywords, and KeyWords Plus.

There were 446,683 publications related to adsorption which included 418,956 articles in SCI-EXPANDED

75 articles with “adsorption”, “sorption”, or “biosorption” in “front page” including titles, abstracts, and author keywords have been cited at least 1000 times from Web of Science Core Collection.

Data last updated 13 February 2017

 

Figure 1. 1000 club of the adsorption by year

 

Figure 2. 1000 club of the adsorption by total citations

 

Figure 3. 1000 club of the adsorption by citations per year

 

Figure 4. 1000 club of the adsorption by total citations in 2016

 

Figure 5. Top articles in 2016 (C2016 > 700)

 

Stephen Brunauer (Deceased)

Paul Hugh Emmett (Deceased)

Edward Teller (Deceased)

1.          Brunauer, S., Emmett, P.H. and Teller, E. (1938), Adsorption of gases in multimolecular layers. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 60 (2), 309-319.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 14628

Addresses: George Washington University, Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, Washington, DC USA

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Charles T. Kresge

2014 Nobel Laureates Predictions

M.E. Leonowicz

Wieslaw J. Roth

James C. Vartuli

Jeffrey S. Beck

2.          Kresge, C.T., Leonowicz, M.E., Roth, W.J., Vartuli, J.C. and Beck, J.S. (1992), Ordered mesoporous molecular sieves synthesized by a liquid-crystal template mechanism. Nature, 359 (6397), 710-712.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 12369

KeyWords Plus: Phosphate

Abstract: MICROPOROUS and mesoporous inorganic solids (with pore diameters of less-than-or-equal-to 20 angstrom and approximately 20-500 angstrom respectively)1 have found great utility as catalysts and sorption media because of their large internal surface area. Typical microporous materials are the crystalline framework solids, such as zeolites2, but the largest pore dimensions found so far are approximately 10-12 angstrom for some metallophosphates3-5 and approximately 14 angstrom for the mineral cacoxenite6. Examples of mesoporous solids include silicas7 and modified layered materials8-11, but these are invariably amorphous or paracrystalline, with pores that are irregularly spaced and broadly distributed in size8,12. Pore size can be controlled by intercalation of layered silicates with a surfactant species9,13, but the final product retains, in part, the layered nature of the precursor material. Here we report the synthesis of mesoporous solids from the calcination of aluminosilicate gels in the presence of surfactants. The material14,15 possesses regular arrays of uniform channels, the dimensions of which can be tailored (in the range 16 angstrom to 100 angstrom or more) through the choice of surfactant, auxiliary chemicals and reaction conditions. We propose that the formation of these materials takes place by means of a liquid-crystal 'templating' mechanism, in which the silicate material forms inorganic walls between ordered surfactant micelles.

Addresses: Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Central Research Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA; Central Research Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA

Present addresses:

Charles T. Kresge:

M.E. Leonowicz:

W.J. Roth:

J.C. Vartuli:

J.S. Beck:

Reprint Address: Charles T. Kresge, Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Paulsboro Research Laboratory, Paulsboro, NJ 08066, USA

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Jeffrey S. Beck

James C. Vartuli

Wieslaw J. Roth

M.E. Leonowicz

Charles T. Kresge

2014 Nobel Laureates Predictions

K.D. Schmitt

C.T.W. Chu

D.H. Olson

E.W. Sheppard

Sharon B. McCullen

J.B. Higgins

J.L. Schlenker

3.          Beck, J.S., Vartuli, J.C., Roth, W.J., Leonowicz, M.E., Kresge, C.T., Schmitt, K.D., Chu, C.T.W., Olson, D.H., Sheppard, E.W., McCullen, S.B., Higgins, J.B. and Schlenker, J.L. (1992), A new family of mesoporous molecular-sieves prepared with liquid crystal templates. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 114 (27), 10834-10843.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 8487

Abstract: The synthesis, characterization, and proposed mechanism of formation of a new family of silicate/aluminosilicate mesoporous molecular sieves designated as M41S is described. MCM-41, one member of this family, exhibits a hexagonal arrangement of uniform mesopores whose dimensions may be engineered in the range of approximately 15 angstrom to greater than 100 angstrom. Other members of this family, including a material exhibiting cubic symmetry, have been synthesized. The larger pore M41S materials typically have surface areas above 700 m2/g and hydrocarbon sorption capacities of 0.7 cc/g and greater. A templating mechanism (liquid crystal templating-LCT) in which surfactant liquid crystal structures serve as organic templates is proposed for the formation of these materials. In support of this templating mechanism, it was demonstrated that the structure and pore dimensions of MCM-41 materials are intimately linked to the properties of the surfactant, including surfactant chain length and solution chemistry. The presence of variable pore size MCM-41, cubic material, and other phases indicates that M41S is an extensive family of materials.

Addresses: Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Paulsboro Research Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543; Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Paulsboro Research Laboratory, Paulsboro, NJ 08066

Present addresses:

J.S. Beck:

J.C. Vartuli:

W.J. Roth:

M.E. Leonowicz:

C.T. Kresge:

K.D. Schmitt:

C.T.W. Chu:

D.H. Olson:

E.W. Sheppard:

S.B. Mccullen:

J.B. Higgins:

J.L. Schlenker:

Reprint Address: Beck, JS, Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Paulsboro Research Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543.

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Irving Langmuir (Deceased)

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1932

4.          Langmuir, I. (1918), The adsorption of gases on plane surfaces of glass, mica and platinum. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 40, 1361-1403.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection:7486

Addresses: Research Laboratory of the General Electric Co., NY USA

Web of Science Category: Chemistry, Multidisciplinary


Yuh-Shan Ho

Gordon McKay

5.          Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (1999), Pseudo-second order model for sorption processes. Process Biochemistry, 34 (5), 451-465.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 5098

Author Keywords: Kinetics; Sorption; Pseudo-Second Order

Abstract: A literature review of the use of sorbents and biosorbents to treat polluted aqueous effluents containing dyes/organics or metal ions has been conducted. Over 70 systems have been reported since 1984 and over 43 of these reported the mechanism as being a pseudo-first order kinetic mechanism. Three sorption kinetic models are presented in this paper and have been used to test 11 of the literature systems previously reported as first order kinetics and one system previously reported as a second order process. In all 12 systems, the highest correlation coefficients were obtained for the pseudo-second order kinetic model. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan. E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Web of Science Category: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Chemical Engineering


Stefan Grimme

Jens Antony

Stephan Ehrlich

Helge Krieg

6.          Grimme, S., Antony, J., Ehrlich, S. and Krieg, H. (2010), A consistent and accurate ab initio parametrization of density functional dispersion correction (DFT-D) for the 94 elements H-Pu. Journal of Chemical Physics, 132 (15), Article Number: 154104.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 4926

Abstract: The method of dispersion correction as an add-on to standard Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT-D) has been refined regarding higher accuracy, broader range of applicability, and less empiricism. The main new ingredients are atom-pairwise specific dispersion coefficients and cutoff radii that are both computed from first principles. The coefficients for new eighth-order dispersion terms are computed using established recursion relations. System (geometry) dependent information is used for the first time in a DFT-D type approach by employing the new concept of fractional coordination numbers (CN). They are used to interpolate between dispersion coefficients of atoms in different chemical environments. The method only requires adjustment of two global parameters for each density functional, is asymptotically exact for a gas of weakly interacting neutral atoms, and easily allows the computation of atomic forces. Three-body nonadditivity terms are considered. The method has been assessed on standard benchmark sets for inter- and intramolecular noncovalent interactions with a particular emphasis on a consistent description of light and heavy element systems. The mean absolute deviations for the S22 benchmark set of noncovalent interactions for 11 standard density functionals decrease by 15%-40% compared to the previous (already accurate) DFT-D version. Spectacular improvements are found for a tripeptide-folding model and all tested metallic systems. The rectification of the long-range behavior and the use of more accurate C-6 coefficients also lead to a much better description of large (infinite) systems as shown for graphene sheets and the adsorption of benzene on an Ag(111) surface. For graphene it is found that the inclusion of three-body terms substantially (by about 10%) weakens the interlayer binding. We propose the revised DFT-D method as a general tool for the computation of the dispersion energy in molecules and solids of any kind with DFT and related (low-cost) electronic structure methods for large systems.

Addresses:

Stefan Grimme: Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Münster, Corrensstrasse 40, D-48149 Münster, Germany

Jens Antony: Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Münster, Corrensstrasse 40, D-48149 Münster, Germany, E-mail: jens.antony@uni-muenster.de

Stephan Ehrlich: Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Münster, Corrensstrasse 40, D-48149 Münster, Germany, E-mail: stephan.ehrlich@uni-muenster.de

Helge Krieg: Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Münster, Corrensstrasse 40, D-48149 Münster, Germany, E-mail: hkrieg@uni-muenster.de

Reprint Address: Stefan Grimme: Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Münster, Corrensstrasse 40, D-48149 Münster, Germany. E-mail: grimmes@uni-muenster.de

Web of Science Category: Atomic Molecular & Chemical Physics


Graeme Henkelman

Blas Pedro Uberuaga

Hannes Jónsson

7.          Henkelman, G., Uberuaga, B.P. and Jonsson, H. (2000), A climbing image nudged elastic band method for finding saddle points and minimum energy paths. Journal of Chemical Physics, 113 (22), 9901-9904.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 4181

Abstract: A modification of the nudged elastic band method for finding minimum energy paths is presented. One of the images is made to climb up along the elastic band to converge rigorously on the highest saddle point. Also, variable spring constants are used to increase the density of images near the top of the energy barrier to get an improved estimate of the reaction coordinate near the saddle point. Applications to CH4 dissociative adsorption on Ir(111) and H-2 on Si(100) using plane wave based density functional theory are presented. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics. [S0021-9606(00)71246-3].

Addresses: University of Washington, Department of Chemistry 351700, Seattle, WA 98195 USA; University of Washington, Department of Physics 351560, Seattle, WA 98195 USA

Present addresses:

Graeme Henkelman: University of Texas Austin, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Austin, TX 78712 USA. E-mail: henkelman@mail.utexas.edu

Blas Pedro Uberuaga: Technical Staff Member, Materials Science and Technology Division (MST-8) Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. E-mail: blas@lanl.gov

Hannes Jónsson: University of Iceland, Chemistry division of the Science Institute, Iceland; E-mail: hj@hi.is

Reprint Address: Henkelman, G, University of Washington, Department of Chemistry 351700, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.

Web of Science Category: Atomic, Molecular & Chemical Physics


Matt Law

Lori E. Greene

Justin C. Johnson

Richard J. Saykally

Peidong Yang

2014 Nobel Laureates Predictions

8.          Law, M., Greene, L.E., Johnson, J.C., Saykally, R. and Yang, P.D. (2005), Nanowire dye-sensitized solar cells. Nature Materials, 4 (6), 455-459.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 4032

Author Keywords: desulfurization; gasoline; fuels; diesel fuel; jet fuel; catalysis; adsorption

Abstract: Excitonic solar cells(1)-including organic, hybrid organic inorganic and dye-sensitized cells (DSCs)-are promising devices for inexpensive, large-scale solar energy conversion. The DSC is currently the most efficient(2) and stable(3) excitonic photocell. Central to this device is a thick nanoparticle film that provides a large surface area for the adsorption of light-harvesting molecules. However, nanoparticle DSCs rely on trap-limited diffusion for electron transport, a slow mechanism that can limit device efficiency, especially at longer wavelengths. Here we introduce a version of the dye-sensitized cell in which the traditional nanoparticle film is replaced by a dense array of oriented, crystalline ZnO nanowires. The nanowire anode is synthesized by mild aqueous chemistry and features a surface area up to one-fifth as large as a nanoparticle cell. The direct electrical pathways provided by the nanowires ensure the rapid collection of carriers generated throughout the device, and a full Sun efficiency of 1.5% is demonstrated, limited primarily by the surface area of the nanowire array.

Addresses: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA; University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA

Present addresses:

Matt Law: University of California, Irvine, Department of Chemistry, 2127 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, CA 92697 USA; E-mail: matt.law@uci.edu

Lori E. Greene: University of California, Irvine, School of Physical Sciences, USA; E-mail: legreene@uci.edu

Justin C. Johnson: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemical and Materials Science Center, USA; E-mail: Justin.Johnson@nrel.gov

Richard Saykally: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA. E-mail: saykally@berkeley.edu

Peidong Yang: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA. E-mail: p_yang@berkeley.edu

Reprint Address: Law, M, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Applied Physics; Condensed Matter Physics


P.C. Lee

Dan Meisel

9.          Lee, P.C. and Meisel, D. (1982), Adsorption and surface-enhanced Raman of dyes on silver and gold sols. Journal of Physical Chemistry, 86 (17), 3391-3395.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 3012

Addresses: Argonne National Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Argonne, IL 60439, USA

Present addresses:

P.C. Lee:

Dan Meisel: Radiation Laboratory and Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. E-mail: dani@nd.edu

Reprint Address: Meisel, D, Argonne National Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Argonne, IL 60439, USA

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry


Masatake Haruta

2012 Nobel Laureates Predictions

10.      Haruta, M. (1997), Size- and support-dependency in the catalysis of gold. Catalysis Today, 36 (1), 153-166.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2951

Author Keywords: Gold Catalysts; Adsorption; Preparation

Abstract: The adsorption properties and reactivities of gold are summarized in terms of their size dependency from bulk to fine particles, clusters and atoms. The catalytic performances of gold markedly depend on dispersion, supports, and preparation methods. When gold is deposited on select metal oxides as hemispherical ultra-fine particles with diameters smaller than 5 nn, it exhibits surprisingly high activities and/or selectivities in the combustion of CO and saturated hydrocarbons, the oxidation-decomposition of amines and organic halogenated compounds, the partial oxidation of hydrocarbons, the hydrogenation of carbon oxides, unsaturated carbonyl compounds, alkynes and alkadienes, and the reduction of nitrogen oxides. The unique catalytic nature of supported gold can be explained by assuming that the gold-metal oxide perimeter interface acts as a site for activating at least one of the reactants, for example, oxygen. Some examples and future prospects in applications are also briefly described.

Addresses: Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan; Kishida Chemicals Company, Ltd, Joshoji-machi, Kadoma 571, Japan; Research Development Corporation of Japan, Science Building, 5-2 Nagata-Cho 2-chome, Tokyo 100 Japan

Present addresses:

Masatake Haruta: Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan; E-mail: haruta-masatake@center.tmu.ac.jp

Reprint Address: Haruta, M (reprint author), Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan

Web of Science Category: Applied Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Anne C. Dillon

Kim M. Jones

T.A. Bekkedahl

C.H. Kiang

Donald S. Bethune

Michael J. Heben

11.      Dillon, A.C., Jones, K.M., Bekkedahl, T.A., Kiang, C.H., Bethune, D.S. and Heben, M.J. (1997), Storage of hydrogen in single-walled carbon nanotubes. Nature, 386 (6623), 377-379.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2947

Abstract: Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores(1), a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls, Pederson and Broughton have suggested(2) that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes(3). Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), Temperature-programmed desorption spectrosocopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon, The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

Addresses: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA; IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA 95120, USA

Present addresses:

Anne C. Dillon: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Center for Materials and Chemical Sciences, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 USA. E-mail: anne.dillon@nrel.gov

Kim M. Jones: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, National Center for Photovoltaics, Golden, CO 80401 USA

T.A. Bekkedahl:

C.H. Kiang:

D.S. Bethune:

Michael J. Heben: Chemical & Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401 USA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 USA. E-mail: mheben@utnet.utoledo.edu

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Bjørk Hammer

L.B. Hansen

Jens K. Nørskov

12.      Hammer, B., Hansen, L.B. and Nørskov, J.K. (1999), Improved adsorption energetics within density-functional theory using revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functionals. Physical Review B, 59 (11), 7413-7421.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2924

Abstract: A simple formulation of a generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation energy of electrons has been proposed by Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996)]. Subsequently Zhang and Yang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 890 (1998)] have shown that a slight revision of the PBE functional systematically improves the atomization energies for a large database of small molecules. In the present work, we show that the Zhang and Yang functional (revPBE) also improves the chemisorption energetics of atoms and molecules on transition-metal surfaces. Our test systems comprise atomic and molecular adsorption of oxygen, CO, and NO on Ni(100), Ni(111), Rh(100), Pd(100), and Pd(111) surfaces. As the revPBE functional may locally violate the Lieb-Oxford criterion, we further develop an alternative revision of the PBE functional, RPBE, which gives the same improvement of the chemisorption energies as the revPBE functional at the same time as it fulfills the Lieb-Oxford criterion locally. [S0163-1829(99)02711-3].

Addresses: University of Aalborg, Institute of Physics, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark; Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics, Center for Atomic-scale Materials Physics, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark

Present addresses:

Bjørk Hammer: University of Aalborg, Institute of Physics, Pontoppidanstr 103, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark

L.B. Hansen:

Jens K. Nørskov:

Reprint Address: Hammer, B, University of Aalborg, Institute of Physics, Pontoppidanstr 103, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark

Web of Science Category: Condensed Matter Physics


Stephen Brunauer

Lola S. Deming

W. Edwards Deming

Edward Teller

13.      Brunauer, S., Deming, L.S., Deming, W.E. and Teller, R. (1940), On a theory of the van der Waals adsorption of gases. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 62 (7), 1723-1732.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2720

Addresses: Bureau of Agricultural Chemistry and Engineering, George Washington University

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Graeme Henkelman

Hannes Jónsson

14.      Henkelman, G. and Jónsson, H. (2000), Improved tangent estimate in the nudged elastic band method for finding minimum energy paths and saddle points. Journal of Chemical Physics, 113 (22), 9978-9985.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2466

Abstract: An improved way of estimating the local tangent in the nudged elastic band method for finding minimum energy paths is presented. In systems where the force along the minimum energy path is large compared to the restoring force perpendicular to the path and when many images of the system are included in the elastic band, kinks can develop and prevent the band from converging to the minimum energy path. We show how the kinks arise and present an improved way of estimating the local tangent which solves the problem. The task of finding an accurate energy and configuration for the saddle point is also discussed and examples given where a complementary method, the dimer method, is used to efficiently converge to the saddle point. Both methods only require the first derivative of the energy and can, therefore, easily be applied in plane wave based density-functional theory calculations. Examples are given from studies of the exchange diffusion mechanism in a Si crystal, Al addimer formation on the Al(100) surface, and dissociative adsorption of CH4 on an Ir(111) surface. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics. [S0021-9606(00)70546-0].

Addresses: Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 USA

Present addresses:

Graeme Henkelman: University of Texas Austin, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Austin, TX 78712 USA. E-mail: henkelman@mail.utexas.edu

Hannes Jónsson: University of Iceland, Chemistry division of the Science Institute, Iceland; E-mail: hj@hi.is

Reprint Address: Henkelman, G (reprint author), Univ Washington, Dept Chem, Box 351700, Seattle, WA 98195 USA

Web of Science Category: Molecular & Chemical Atomic Physics


Stephen V. Boyden

15.      Boyden, S.V. (1951), The adsorption of proteins on erythrocytes treated with tannic acid and subsequent hemagglutination by antiprotein sera. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 93 (2), 107-120.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2076

Addresses: Laboratories of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research; Animal Health Trust, London, England.

Web of Science Category: Immunology; Research & Experimental Medicine


Gero Decher

Jong-Dal Hong

Johannes Schmitt

16.      Decher, G., Hong, J.D. and Schmitt, J. (1992), Buildup of ultrathin multilayer films by a self-assembly process. III. Consecutively alternating adsorption of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on charged surfaces. Thin Solid Films, 210 (1-2), 831-835.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection:2074

Abstract: Abstract: A solid substrate with a positively charged planar surface is immersed in a solution containing an anionic polyelectrolyte and a monolayer of the polyanion is adsorbed. Since the adsorption is carried out at relatively high concentrations of polyelectrolyte, a large number of ionic residues remain exposed to the interface with the solution and thus the surface charge is effectively reversed. After rinsing in pure water the substrate is immersed in the solution containing a cationic polyelectrolyte. Again a monolayer is adsorbed but now the original surface charge is restored. By repeating both steps in a cyclic fashion, alternating multilayer assemblies of both polymers are obtained. The buildup of the multilayer films was followed by UV/vis spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). It is demonstrated that multilayer films composed of at least 100 consecutively alternating layers can be assembled.

Addresses: Inslitut fur Physikalische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitiit, Welder Weg II, D-6500 Main, Germany

Present addresses:

Gero Decher: Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Mainz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Jong-Dal Hong: Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Mainz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Johannes Schmitt: Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Mainz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Reprint Address: Decher, Gero (reprint author), Univ Mainz, Inst Phys Chem, W-6500 Mainz, GERMANY

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Materials Science; Coatings & Films Materials Science; Applied Physics; Condensed Matter Physics


C.H. Giles

T.H. MacEwan

S.N. Nakhwa

D. Smith

17.      Giles, C.H., MacEwan, T.H., Nakhwa, S.N. and Smith, D. (1960), Studies in adsorption. Part XI. A system of classification of solution adsorption isotherms, and its use in diagnosis of adsorption mechanisms and in measurement of specific surface areas of solids. Journal of the Chemical Society, 60, 3973-3993.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1923

Address: Department of Chemical Technology, the Royal College of Science and Technology, Glasgow, UK

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Md Khaja Nazeeruddin

Peter Péchy

Thierry Renouard

Shaik M. Zakeeruddin

Robin Humphry-Baker

Pascal Comte

Paul Liska

Le Cevey

Emiliana Costa

Valery Shklover

Leone Spiccia

Glen B. Deacon

Carlo A. Bignozzi

Michael Grätzel

 

18.      Nazeeruddin, M.K., Péchy, P., Renouard, T., Zakeeruddin, S.M., Humphry-Baker, R., Comte, P., Liska, P., Cevey, L., Costa, E., Shklover, V., Spiccia, L., Deacon, G.B., Bignozzi, C.A. and Gratzel, M. (2001), Engineering of efficient panchromatic sensitizers for nanocrystalline TiO2-based solar cells. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 123 (8), 1613-1624.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1914

Abstract: A new series of panchromatic ruthenium(II) sensitizers derived from carboxylated terpyridyl complexes of tris-thiocyanato Ru(II) have been developed. Black dye containing different degrees of protonation {(C2H5)(3)NH}[Ru(H(3)tcterpy)(NCS)(3)] 1, {(C4H9)(4)N}(2)[Ru(H(2)tcterpy)(NCS)(3)] 2, {(C4H9)(4)N}(3)[RU(Htcterpy)(NCS)(3)] 3, and {(C4H9)(4)N}(4)[Ru(tcterpy)(NCS)(3)] 4 (tcterpy = 4,4',4 “ -tricarboxy-2,2':6',2 “ -terpyridine) have been synthesized and fully characterized by UV-vis, emission, IR, Raman, NMR, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray diffraction studies. The crystal structure of complex 2 confirms the presence of a Ru(II)N6 central core derived from the terpyridine ligand and three N-bonded thiocyanates. Intermolecular H-bonding between carboxylates on neighboring terpyridines gives rise to 2-D H-bonded arrays. The absorption and emission maxima of the black dye show a bathochromic shift with decreasing pH and exhibit pH-dependent excited-state lifetimes. The red-shift of the emission maxima is due to better pi -acceptor properties of the acid form that lowers the energy of the CT excited state. The low-energy metal-to-ligand charge-transfer absorption band showed marked solvatochromism due to the presence of thiocyanate ligands. The Ru(II)/(III) oxidation potential of the black dye and the ligand-based reduction potential shifted cathodically with decreasing number of protons and showed more reversible character. The adsorption of complex 3 from methoxyacetonitrile solution onto transparent TiO2 films was interpreted by a Langmuir isotherm yielding an adsorption equilibrium constant, K-ads, of (1.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(5) M-1. The amount of dye adsorbed at monolayer saturation was (n(alpha) = 6.9 +/- 0.3) x 10(-8) mol/mg of TiO2, which is around 30% less than that of the cis-di(thiocyanato)bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate)-ruthenium(II) complex. The black dye, when anchored to nanocrystalline;TiO2. films achieves very efficient sensitization over the whole visible range extending into the near-IR region up to 920 nm, yielding over 80% incident photon to-current efficiencies (IPCE). solar cells containing the black dye were subjected to analysis by a photovoltaic calibration laboratory (NREL, U.S.A.) to determine their solar-to-electric conversion efficiency under standard AM 1.5 sunlight. A short circuit photocurrent density obtained was 20.5 mA/cm(2), and the open circuit voltage was 0.72 V corresponding to an overall conversion efficiency of 10.4%.

Addresses: Contribution from the Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Present addresses:

Md Khaja Nazeeruddin: Contribution from the Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland. E-mail: Mdkhaja.Nazeeruddin@epfl.ch

Peter Péchy: École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Section, Switzerland

Thierry Renouard:

Shaik M. Zakeeruddin:

Robin Humphry-Baker:

Pascal Comte:

Paul Liska:

Le Cevey:

Emiliana Costa: Dipartimento de Chimica, Università di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara, Italy

Valery Shklover: Laboratory of Crystallography, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland

Leone Spiccia: Centre for Green Chemistry and Department of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3168, Australia. E-mail: Leone.Spiccia@monash.edu

Glen B. Deacon: Centre for Green Chemistry and Department of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3168, Australia. E-mail: Glen.Deacon@monash.edu

Carlo A. Bignozzi: Dipartimento de Chimica, Università di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara, Italy

Michael Gra1tzel:

Reprint Address: Nazeeruddin, MK (reprint author), Contribution from the Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

E-mail Addresses: Mdkhaja.Nazeeruddin@epfl.ch

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Samuel W. Karickhoff

David S. Brown

Trudy A. Scott

19.      Karickhoff, S.W., Brown, D.S. and Scott, T.A. (1979), Sorption of hydrophobic pollutants on natural sediments. Water Research, 13 (3), 241-248.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1902

Address: Environmental Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605, U.S.A.

Reprint Address: Karickhoff, SW, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Research Laboratory, College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605, USA

Present addresses:

S.W. Karickhoff,

D.S. Brown,

T.A. Scott,

Web of Science Category: Environmental Engineering; Environmental Sciences; Water Resources


Nina I. Kovtyukhova

Patricia J. Ollivier

Benjamin R. Martin

Thomas E. Mallouk

Sergey A. Chizhik

Eugenia V. Buzaneva

Alexandr D. Gorchinskiy

 

20.      Kovtyukhova, N.I., Ollivier, P.J., Martin, B.R., Mallouk, T.E., Chizhik, S.A., Buzaneva, E.V. and Gorchinskiy, A.D. (1999), Layer-by-layer assembly of ultrathin composite films from micron-sized graphite oxide sheets and polycations. Chemistry of Materials, 11 (3), 771-778.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1881

Abstract: Unilamellar colloids of graphite oxide (GO) were prepared from natural graphite and were grown as monolayer and multilayer thin films on cationic surfaces by electrostatic self-assembly. The multilayer films were grown by alternate adsorption of anionic GO sheets and cationic poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). The monolayer films consisted of 11-14 Angstrom thick GO sheets, with lateral dimensions between 150 nm and 9 mu m. Silicon substrates primed with amine monolayers gave partial GO monolayers, but surfaces primed with Al13O4-(OH)(24)(H2O)(12)(7+) ions gave densely tiled films that covered approximately 90% of the surface. When alkaline GO colloids were used, the monolayer assembly process selected the largest sheets (from 900 nm to 9 mu m) from the suspension. In this case, many of the flexible sheets appeared folded in AFM images. Multilayer (GO/PAH)(n) films were invariably thicker than expected from the individual thicknesses of the sheets and the polymer monolayers, and this behavior is also attributed to folding of the sheets. Multilayer (GO/PAH), and (GO/polyaniline)(n) films grown between indium-tin oxide and Pt electrodes show diodelike behavior, and higher currents are observed with the conductive polyaniline-containing films. The resisitivity of these films is decreased, as expected, by partial reduction of GO to carbon.

Addresses:

Nina I. Kovtyukhova: Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31, Pr. Nauky, 252022 Kyiv, Ukraine

Patricia J. Ollivier: Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

Benjamin R. Martin: Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

Thomas E. Mallouk: Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

Sergey A. Chizhik: Metal-Polymer Research Institute, 32A Kirov Street, Gomel, 246652, Belarus, Ukraine

Eugenia V. Buzaneva: National T. Shevchenko University, 64, Vladimirskaya Str., 252033 Kyiv, Ukraine

Alexandr D. Gorchinskiy: National T. Shevchenko University, 64, Vladimirskaya Str., 252033 Kyiv, Ukraine

Present addresses:

Nina I. Kovtyukhova: Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA, E-mail: nina@chem.psu.edu

Reprint Address: Nina I. Kovtyukhova: Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31, Pr. Nauky, 252022 Kyiv, Ukraine

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


T.E. Springer

Thomas A. Zawodzinski

S. Gottesfeld

21.      Springer, T.E., Zawodzinski, T.A. and Gottesfeld, S. (1991), Polymer electrolyte fuel cell model. Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 138 (8), 2334-2342.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1845

Abstract: We present here an isothermal, one-dimensional, steady-state model for a complete polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) with a 117 Nafion(R) membrane. In this model we employ water diffusion coefficients electro-osmotic drag coefficients, water sorption isotherms, and membrane conductivities, all measured in our laboratory as functions of membrane water content. The model predicts a net-water-per-proton flux ratio of 0.2 H2O/H+ under typical operating conditions, which is much less than the measured electro-osmotic drag coefficient for a fully hydrated membrane. It also predicts an increase in membrane resistance with increased current density and demonstrates the great advantage of a thinner membrane in alleviating this resistance problem. Both of these predictions were verified experimentally under certain conditions.

Present addresses:

T.E. Springer:

T.A. Zawodzinski:

S. Gottesfeld:

Reprint Address: Springer, TE, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA

Web of Science Category: Electrochemistry; Coatings & Films Materials Science


Vojislav R. Stamenkovic

Ben Fowler

Bongjin Simon Mun

Guofeng Wang

Philip N. Ross

Christopher A. Lucas

Nenad M. Marković

 

22.      Stamenkovic, V.R., Fowler, B., Mun, B.S., Wang, G.F., Ross, P.N., Lucas, C.A. and Marković, N.M. (2007), Improved oxygen reduction activity on Pt3Ni(111) via increased surface site availability. Science, 315 (5811), 493-497.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1819

Abstract: The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell ( PEMFC) is the main limitation for automotive applications. We demonstrated that the Pt3Ni( 111) surface is 10-fold more active for the ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and 90-fold more active than the current state-of-the- art Pt/C catalysts for PEMFC. The Pt3Ni( 111) surface has an unusual electronic structure (d-band center position) and arrangement of surface atoms in the near-surface region. Under operating conditions relevant to fuel cells, its near-surface layer exhibits a highly structured compositional oscillation in the outermost and third layers, which are Pt-rich, and in the second atomic layer, which is Ni-rich. The weak interaction between the Pt surface atoms and nonreactive oxygenated species increases the number of active sites for O-2 adsorption.

Addresses:

Argonne Natl Lab, Div Mat Sci, Argonne, IL 60439 USA.

Univ Calif Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Div Sci Mat, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.

Univ Liverpool, Dept Phys, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool L69 7ZE, Merseyside, England.

Univ S Carolina, Dept Chem & Phys, Aiken, SC 29801 USA.

Present addresses:

Vojislav R. Stamenkovic: Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA. E-mail: vrstamenkovic@anl.gov

Ben Fowler: Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE, UK.

Bongjin Simon Mun: Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

Guofeng Wang: Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of South Carolina, Aiken, SC 29801, USA.

Philip N. Ross: Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. E-mail: PNRoss@lbl.gov

Christopher A. Lucas: Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE, UK. E-mail: Clucas@liverpool.ac.uk

Nenad M. Marković: Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA. E-mail: nmmarkovic@anl.gov

Reprint Address: Stamenkovic, VR. Argonne Natl Lab, Div Mat Sci, 9700 S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 USA. E-mail: vrstamenkovic@anl.gov

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Yoshio Idota

Tadahiko Kubota

Akihiro Matsufuji

Yukio Maekawa

Tsutomu Miyasaka

23.      Idota, Y., Kubota, T., Matsufuji, A., Maekawa, Y. and Miyasaka, T. (1997), Tin-based amorphous oxide: A high-capacity lithium-ion-storage material. Science, 276 (5317), 1395-1397.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1815

Abstract: A high-capacity lithium-storage material in metal-oxide form has been synthesized that can replace the carbon-based lithium intercalation materials currently in extensive use as the negative electrode (anode) of lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. This tin-based amorphous composite oxide (TCO) contains Sn(II)-O as the active center for lithium insertion and other glass-forming elements, which make up an oxide network. The TCO anode yields a specific capacity for reversible lithium adsorption more than 50 percent higher than those of the carbon families that persists after charge-discharge cycling when coupled with a lithium cobalt oxide cathode. Lithium-7 nuclear magnetic resonance measurements evidenced the high ionic state of lithium retained in the charged state, in which TCO accepted 8 moles of lithium ions per unit mole.

Addresses: Y. Idota and T. Kubota, Fujifilm Celltec, Matsuzakadaira 1-6, Taiwa-cho, Kurokawa-gun, Miyagi 981-34, Japan

A. Matsufuji, Y. Maekawa, T. Miyasaka, Ashigara Re- search Laboratories, Fuji Photo Film, Nakanuma 210, Minamiashigara, Kanagawa 250-01, Japan

Present addresses:

Yoshio Idota:

Tadahiko Kubota:

Akihiro Matsufuji:

Yukio Maekawa:

Tsutomu Miyasaka: Toin University of Yokohama, Graduate School of Engineering, Japan. E-mail: miyasaka@toin.ac.jp

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Kyo Sung Park

Zheng Ni

Adrien P. Côté

Jae Yong Choi

Rudan Huang

Fernando J. Uribe-Romo

Hee K. Chae

Michael O’Keeffe

Omar M. Yaghi

2010 Nobel Laureates Predictions

 

24.      Park, K.S., Ni, Z., Cote, A.P., Choi, J.Y., Huang, R.D., Uribe-Romo, F.J., Chae, H.K., O’Keeffe, M. and Yaghi, O.M. (2006), Exceptional chemical and thermal stability of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103 (27), 10186-10191.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1715

Abstract: Twelve zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs; termed ZIF-1 to -12) have been synthesized as crystals by copolymerization of either Zn(II) (ZIF-1 to -4, -6 to -8, and -10 to -11) or Co(II) (ZIF-9 and -12) with imidazolate-type links. The ZIF crystal structures are based on the nets of seven distinct aluminosilicate zeolites: tetrahedral Si(AI) and the bridging O are replaced with transition metal ion and imidazolate link, respectively. In addition, one example of mixed-coordination imidazolate of Zn(II) and In(III) (ZIF-5) based on the garnet net is reported. Study of the gas adsorption and thermal and chemical stability of two prototypical members, ZIF-8 and -11, demonstrated their permanent porosity (Langmuir surface area = 1,810 m(2)/g), high thermal stability (up to 550 degrees C), and remarkable chemical resistance to boiling alkaline water and organic solvents.

Addresses: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Reticular Materials Research at California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-748, South Korea.

Institute for Chemical Physics, School of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China.

Department of Chemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA.

Present addresses:

Kyo Sung Park:

Zheng Ni:

Adrien P. Côté:

Jae Yong Choi:

Rudan Huang:

Fernando J. Uribe-Romo:

Hee K. Chae:

Michael O’Keeffe: Department of Chemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA. E-mail: mokeeffe@asu.edu

Omar M. Yaghi: E-mail: yaghi@berkeley.edu

Reprint Address: Yaghi, OM (reprint author), Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Reticular Materials Research at California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA. E-mail: yaghi@chem.ucla.edu

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Peter C. LeBaron

Zhen Wang

Thomas J. Pinnavaia

25.      LeBaron, P.C., Wang, Z. and Pinnavaia, TJ. (1999), Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites: an overview. Applied Clay Science, 15 (1-2), 11-29.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1692

Author Keywords: polymers; silicates; nanocomposites

Abstract: An overview of polymer-clay hybrid nanocomposites is provided with emphasis placed on the use of alkylammonium exchanged smectite clays as the reinforcement phase in selected polymer matrices. A few weight percent loading of organoclay in nylon 6 boosts the heat distortion temperature by 80 degrees C, making possible structural applications under conditions where the pristine polymer would normally fail. A similar loading of clay nanolayers in elastomeric epoxy and polyurethane matrices dramatically improves bath the toughness and the tensile properties of these thermoset systems. Glassy epoxy nanocomposites exhibit substantial improvement in yield strength and modulus under compressive stress-strain conditions. The latest development in polypropylene hybrids have yielded nanocomposites with improved storage moduli. Polyimide hybrids in thin-film form display a 10-fold decrease in permeability toward water vapor at 2 wt.% clay loading. In situ and melt intercalation processing methods are effective in producing reinforced polystyrene hybrids. Nitrile rubber hybrids show improved storage moduli and reduced permeabilities even toward gases as small as hydrogen. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-clay nanocomposites prepared by in situ polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone in organoclay galleries show a substantial reduction in water adsorption. Polysiloxane nanocomposites produced from poly(dimethylsiloxane) and organoclay mixtures have improved in tensile properties, thermal stability and resistance to swelling solvents. Organoclay-poly(l-lactide) composite film was obtained by solvent casting technique. Clay nanolayers dispersed in liquid crystals act as structure directors and form hybrids composites that can be switched from being highly opaque to highly transparent by applying an electric field of short duration. (C) 1999 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

Addresses: Michigan State Univ, Dept Chem, Funct Mat Res Ctr, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA; Michigan State Univ, Ctr Composite Mat & Struct, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA

Present addresses:

Peter C. LeBaron: E-mail: PCLeBaron@dow.com

Zhen Wang: Amcol International, 2870 Forbs Avenue, Hoffman Estates, IL 60192, USA. E-mail: zhen.wang@cetco.com

Thomas J. Pinnavaia: Department of Chemistry, Center for Fundamental Materials Research and Composite Materials and Structure Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA; E-mail: pinnavai@cem.msu.edu

Reprint Address: Thomas J. Pinnavaia, Department of Chemistry, Center for Fundamental Materials Research and Composite Materials and Structure Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA, pinnavai@cem.msu.edu

Web of Science Category: Mineralogy


David Xiulei Ji

Kyu Tae Lee

Linda F. Nazar

26.      Ji, X.L., Lee, K.T. and Nazar, L.F. (2009), A highly ordered nanostructured carbon-sulphur cathode for lithium-sulphur batteries. Nature Materials, 8 (6), 500-506.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1678

Abstract: The Li-S battery has been under intense scrutiny for over two decades, as it offers the possibility of high gravimetric capacities and theoretical energy densities ranging up to a factor of five beyond conventional Li-ion systems. Herein, we report the feasibility to approach such capacities by creating highly ordered interwoven composites. The conductive mesoporous carbon framework precisely constrains sulphur nanofiller growth within its channels and generates essential electrical contact to the insulating sulphur. The structure provides access to Li(+) ingress/egress for reactivity with the sulphur, and we speculate that the kinetic inhibition to diffusion within the framework and the sorption properties of the carbon aid in trapping the polysulphides formed during redox. Polymer modification of the carbon surface further provides a chemical gradient that retards diffusion of these large anions out of the electrode, thus facilitating more complete reaction. Reversible capacities up to 1,320m Ah g(-1) are attained. The assembly process is simple and broadly applicable, conceptually providing new opportunities for materials scientists for tailored design that can be extended to many different electrode materials.

Addresses: University of Waterloo, Department of Chemistry, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada

Present addresses:

Xiulei Ji: Departmenet of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA. E-mail: david.ji@oregonstate.edu

Kyu Tae Lee: Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea. E-mail: ktlee@unist.ac.kr

Linda F. Nazar: Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 Canada. E-mail: lfnazar@uw­aterloo.ca

Reprint Address: Linda F. Nazar (reprint author) University of Waterloo, Department of Chemistry, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada. E-mail: lfnazar@uwaterloo.ca

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry; Multidisciplinary Materials Science; Applied Physics; Condensed Matter Physics


Yuh-Shan Ho

Gordon McKay

27.      Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (1998), Sorption of dye from aqueous solution by peat. Chemical Engineering Journal, 70 (2), 115-124.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1664

Author Keywords: Peat; Lead; Copper; Nickel; Kinetics and Sorption

Abstract: A pseudo-second order rate equation describing the kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat at different initial metal ion concentrations and pear doses has been developed. The kinetics of sorption were followed based on the amounts of metal sorbed at various time intervals. Results show that sorption (chemical bonding) might be rate-limiting in the sorption of divalent metal ions onto peat during agitated batch contact time experiments. The rate constant, the equilibrium sorption capacity and the initial sorption rate were calculated. From these parameters, an empirical model for predicting the sorption capacity of metal ions sorbed was derived. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan. E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Web of Science Category: Environmental Engineering; Environmental Sciences; Water Resources


Byoungwoo Kang

Gerbrand Ceder

28.      Kang, B. and Ceder, G. (2009), Battery materials for ultrafast charging and discharging. Nature, 458 (7235), 190-193.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1642

Abstract: The storage of electrical energy at high charge and discharge rate is an important technology in today's society, and can enable hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and provide back-up for wind and solar energy. It is typically believed that in electrochemical systems very high power rates can only be achieved with supercapacitors, which trade high power for low energy density as they only store energy by surface adsorption reactions of charged species on an electrode material(1-3). Here we show that batteries(4,5) which obtain high energy density by storing charge in the bulk of a material can also achieve ultrahigh discharge rates, comparable to those of supercapacitors. We realize this in LiFePO(4) (ref. 6), a material with high lithium bulk mobility(7,8), by creating a fast ion-conducting surface phase through controlled off-stoichiometry. A rate capability equivalent to full battery discharge in 10-20 s can be achieved.

Addresses: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA

Present addresses:

Byoungwoo Kang: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. E-mail:

Gerbrand Ceder: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. E-mail: gceder@mit.edu

Reprint Address: Ceder, Gerbrand (reprint author), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. E-mail: gceder@mit.edu

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Paul E. Laibinis

George M. Whitesides

2005 Nobel Laureates Predictions

David L. Allara

Yu-Tai Tao

Atul N. Parikh

Ralph G. Nuzzo

29.      Laibinis, P.E., Whitesides, G.M., Allara, D.L., Tao, Y.T., Parikh, A.N. and Nuzzo, R.G. (1991), Comparison of the structures and wetting properties of self-assembled monolayers of n-alkanethiols on the coinage metal surfaces, Cu, Ag, Au. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 113 (19), 7152-7167.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1639

Abstract: Long-chain alkanethiols, HS(CH2)nCH3, adsorb from solution onto the surfaces of gold, silver, and copper and form monolayers. Reflection infrared spectroscopy indicates that monolayers on silver and on copper (when carefully prepared) have the chains in well-defined molecular orientations and in crystalline-like phase states, as has been observed on gold. Monolayers on silver are structurally related to those formed by adsorption on gold, but different in details of orientation. The monolayers formed on copper are structurally more complex and show a pronounced sensitivity to the details of the sample preparation. Quantitative analysis of the IR data using numerical simulations based on an average single chain model suggests that the alkyl chains in monolayers on silver are all-trans zig-zag and canted by approximately 12-degrees from the normal to the surface. The analysis also suggests a twist of the plane containing the carbon backbone of approximately 45-degrees from the plane defined by the tilt and surface normal vectors. For comparison, the monolayers that form on adsorption of alkanethiols on gold surfaces, as judged by their vibrational spectra, are also trans zig-zag extended but, when interpreted in the context of the same single chain model, have a cant angle of approximately 27-degrees and a twist of the plane of the carbon backbone of approximately 53-degrees. The monolayers formed on copper (when they are obtained in high quality) exhibit infrared spectra effectively indistinguishable from those on silver and thus appear to have the same structure. Films on copper are also commonly obtained that are structurally ill-defined and appear to contain significant densities of gauche conformations. These spectroscopically based interpretations are compatible with inferences from wetting and XPS measurements. The structure of the substrate-sulfur interface appears to control molecular orientations of the alkyl groups in these films. An improved structural model, incorporating a two-chain unit cell and allowing for the temperature-dependent population of gauche conformations, is presented and applied to the specific case of the structures formed on gold.

Addresses: Academia Sinica, Institute of Chemistry, Taipei 115, Taiwan; University of Illinois, Department of Chemistry, Urbana, IL 61801; University of Illinois, Department of Materials Science, Urbana, IL 61801; Harvard University, Department of Chemistry, Cambridge, MA 02138; Pennsylvania State University, Department of Materials Science, University PK, PA 16802; At&T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ 07974; Pennsylvania State University, Department of Chemistry, University PK, PA 16802

Present addresses:

Paul E. Laibinis: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235, USA, E-mail: paul.e.laibinis@vanderbilt.edu

George M. Whitesides: Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Email: gwhitesides@gmwgroup.harvard.edu

David L. Allara: Pennsylvania State University, Department of Chemistry, University PK, PA 16802, USA. E-mail: dla3@psu.edu

Yu-Tai Tao: Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan. E-mail: ytt@chem.sinica.edu.tw

Atul N. Parikh: University of California, Davis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Davis, CA 95616 USA. E-mail: anparikh@ucdavis.edu

Ralph G. Nuzzo: Department of Chemistry and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. E-mail: r-nuzzo@uiuc.edu

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Hak Soo Choi

Wenhao Liu

Preeti Misra

Eiichi Tanaka

John P. Zimmer

Binil Itty Ipe

Moungi G. Bawendi

John V. Frangioni

30.      Choi, H.S., Liu, W., Misra, P., Tanaka, E., Zimmer, J.P., Ipe, B.I., Bawendi, M.G. and Frangioni, J.V. (2007), Renal clearance of quantum dots. Nature Biotechnology, 25 (10), 1165-1170.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1607

Author Keywords:

Abstract: The field of nanotechnology holds great promise for the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. However, the size and charge of most nanoparticles preclude their efficient clearance from the body as intact nanoparticles. Without such clearance or their biodegradation into biologically benign components, toxicity is potentially amplified and radiological imaging is hindered. Using intravenously administered quantum dots in rodents as a model system, we have precisely defined the requirements for renal filtration and urinary excretion of inorganic, metal-containing nanoparticles. Zwitterionic or neutral organic coatings prevented adsorption of serum proteins, which otherwise increased hydrodynamic diameter by > 15 nm and prevented renal excretion. A final hydrodynamic diameter <5.5 nm resulted in rapid and efficient urinary excretion and elimination of quantum dots from the body. This study provides a foundation for the design and development of biologically targeted nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

Addresses:

Hak Soo Choi: Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Room SL-B05, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

Wenhao Liu: Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 6-221, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Preeti Misra: Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Room SL-B05, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

Eiichi Tanaka: Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Room SL-B05, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

John P. Zimmer: Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 6-221, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Binil Itty Ipe: Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 6-221, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Moungi G. Bawendi: Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 6-221, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Present addresses:

Hak Soo Choi:

Wenhao Liu: Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 6-221, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Preeti Misra:

Eiichi Tanaka:

John P. Zimmer: Smith Moore Leatherwood LLP, Charlotte, 101 N. Tryon St., Suite 1300 NC, USA. E-mail: john.zimmer@smithmoorelaw.com

Binil Itty Ipe:

Moungi G. Bawendi: Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 6-221, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. E-mail Addresseses: mgb@mit.edu

John V. Frangioni:

Reprint Address:

John V. Frangioni (reprint author), Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, 330 Brookline Ave, Room SL-BO5, Boston, MA 02215 USA. E-mail Addresseses: jfrangio@bidmc.harvard.edu

Moungi G. Bawendi (reprint author), Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building 6-221, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. E-mail Addresseses: mgb@mit.edu

Web of Science Category: Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology


Alan L. Myers

John M. Prausnitz

31.      Myers, A.L. and Prausnitz, J.M. (1965), Thermodynamics of mixed-gas adsorption. AIChE Journal, 11 (1), 121-127.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1583

Abstract: A simple technique is described for calculating the adsorption equilibria for components in a gaseous mixture, using only data for the pure-component adsorption equilibria at the same temperature and on the same adsorbent. The proposed technique is based on the concept of an ideal adsorbed solution and, using classical surface thermodynamics, an expression analogous to Raoult’s law is obtained. The essential idea of the calculation lies in the recognition that in an ideal solution the partial pressure of an adsorbed component is given by the product of its mole fraction in the adsorbed phase and the pressure which it would exert as a pure adsorbed Component at the same temperature and spreading pressure as those of the mixture. Predicted isotherms give excellent agreement with experimental data for methaneethane and ethylene-carbon dioxide on activated carbon and for carbon monoxide-oxygen and propane-propylene on silica gel. The simDlicitv of the calculation, which requires no data for the mixture, makes it especially useful for engineering applications.

Present addresses:

Myers, A.L.:

John M. Prausnitz: University of California, Berkeley, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, California, USA, E-mail: Prausnit@cchem.berkeley.edu

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering


G.E. Boyd

A.W. Adamson

L.S. Jr. Myers

32.      Boyd, G.E., Adamson, A.W. and Myers, Jr., L.S. (1947), The exchange adsorption of ions from aqueous solutions by organic zeolites. II. Kinetics. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 69 (11), 2836-2848.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1581

Address: Clinton National Laboratory

Present addresses:

Boyd, G.E.:

Adamson, A.W.:

Myers, Jr., L.S.:

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Jens K. Nørskov

Jan Rossmeisl

Áshildur Logadóttir

L. Lindqvist

John R. Kitchin

Thomas Bligaard

Hannes Jónsson

 

33.      Nørskov, J.K., Rossmeisl, J., Logadottir, A., Lindqvist, L., Kitchin, J.R., Bligaard, T. and Jónsson, H. (2004), Origin of the overpotential for oxygen reduction at a fuel-cell cathode. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 108 (46), 17886-17892.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1577

Author Keywords:

Abstract: We present a method for calculating the stability of reaction intermediates of electrochemical processes on the basis of electronic structure calculations. We used that method in combination with detailed density functional calculations to develop a detailed description of the free-energy landscape of the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction over Pt(111) as a function of applied bias. This allowed us to identify the origin of the overpotential found for this reaction. Adsorbed oxygen and hydroxyl are found to be very stable intermediates at potentials close to equilibrium, and the calculated rate constant for the activated proton/electron transfer to adsorbed oxygen or hydroxyl can account quantitatively for the observed kinetics. On the basis of a database of calculated oxygen and hydroxyl adsorption energies, the trends in the oxygen reduction rate for a large number of different transition and noble metals can be accounted for. Alternative reaction mechanisms involving proton/electron transfer to adsorbed molecular oxygen were also considered, and this peroxide mechanism was found to dominate for the most noble metals. The model suggests ways to improve the electrocatalytic properties of fuel-cell cathodes.

Addresses:

Center for Atomic-scale Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716

Science Institute, VR-II, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavík, Iceland

Faculty of Science, VR-II, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavík, Iceland

Present addresses:

Jens K. Nørskov: Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA. E-mail: norskov@stanford.edu

Jan Rossmeisl: Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Capital Region, Denmark. E-mail: jross@fysik.dtu.dk

Áshildur Logadóttir: Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Capital Region, Denmark

L Lindqvist: Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark

John R. Kitchin: Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA. E-mail: jkitchin@andrew.cmu.edu

Thomas Bligaard: Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA. E-mail: bligaard@stanford.edu

Hannes Jónsson: University of Iceland, Chemistry division of the Science Institute, Iceland; E-mail: hj@hi.is

Reprint Address:

J.K. Nørskov (reprint author), Center for Atomic-scale Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark. E-mail Addresseses: norskov@fysik.dtu.dk

Web of Science Category: Chemistry, Physical


Yuh-Shan Ho

Gordon McKay

34.      Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (2000), The kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat. Water Research, 34 (3), 735-742.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1545

Author Keywords: Peat; Lead; Copper; Nickel; Kinetics and Sorption

Abstract: A pseudo-second order rate equation describing the kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat at different initial metal ion concentrations and pear doses has been developed. The kinetics of sorption were followed based on the amounts of metal sorbed at various time intervals. Results show that sorption (chemical bonding) might be rate-limiting in the sorption of divalent metal ions onto peat during agitated batch contact time experiments. The rate constant, the equilibrium sorption capacity and the initial sorption rate were calculated. From these parameters, an empirical model for predicting the sorption capacity of metal ions sorbed was derived. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan. E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Web of Science Category: Environmental Engineering; Environmental Sciences; Water Resources


C. Liu

Y.Y. Fan

M. Liu

H.T. Cong

Hui-Ming Cheng

Mildred Dresselhaus

35.      Liu, C., Fan, Y.Y., Liu, M., Cong, H.T., Cheng, H.M. and Dresselhaus, M.S. (1999), Hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes at room temperature. Science, 286 (5442), 1127-1129.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1530

Abstract: Masses of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a large mean diameter of about 1.85 nanometers, synthesized by a semicontinuous hydrogen are discharge method, were employed for hydrogen adsorption experiments in their as-prepared and pretreated states. A hydrogen storage capacity of 4.2 weight percent, or a hydrogen to carbon atom ratio of: 0.52, was achieved reproducibly at room temperature under a modestly high pressure (about 10 megapascal) for a SWNT sample of about 500 milligram weight that was soaked in hydrochloric acid and then heat-treated in vacuum. Moreover, 78.3 percent of the adsorbed hydrogen (3.3 weight percent) could be released under ambient pressure at room temperature, while the release of the residual stored hydrogen (0.9 weight percent) required some heating of the sample. Because the SWNTs can be easily produced and show reproducible and modestly high hydrogen uptake at room temperature, they show promise as an effective hydrogen storage material.

Addresses: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metals Research, Shenyang 110015, People’s R China; MIT, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA; MIT, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA

Present addresses:

C. Liu:

Y.Y. Fan:

M. Liu:

H.T. Cong:

Hui-Ming Cheng: Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: cheng@imr.ac.cn

Mildred S. Dresselhaus:

Reprint Address: Dresselhaus, MS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metals Research, 72 Wenhua Rd, Shenyang 110015, People’s R China.

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Kenneth R. Hall

Lee C. Eagleton

Andreas Acrivos

Theodore Vermeulen

36.      Hall, K.R., Eagleton, L.C., Acrivos, A. and Vermeulen, T. (1966), Pore- and solid-diffuion kinetics in fixed-bed adsorption under constant-pattern conditions. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Fundamentals, 5 (2), 212-223.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1519

Abstract: Abstract: In the favorable-equilibrium adsorption region, the constant-pattern form of the isothermal breakthrough curves is known only approximately for the solid-diffusion (or pore-surface-diffusion) mechanism, and is not soluble analytically for the pore-diffusion mechanism. Numerical solutions for both these cases, in a widely applicable dimensionless form, have been obtained for a range of Langmuir isotherms by stepwise computation on a digital computer. These numerical results merge smoothly into the respective analytic solutions for completely irreversible equilibrium; for this case, combinations of pore diffusion and external mass transfer are also analyzed.

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA

Present addresses:

Kenneth R. Hall: Texas A&M University, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, TX 77843 USA, E-mail: krhall@tamu.edu

Lee C. Eagleton:

Andreas Acrivos:

Theodore Vermeulen:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering; Industrial Engineering


José Luís Cabral da Conceição Figueiredo

Manuel F.R. Pereira

Madalena M.A. Freitas

J.J.M. Órfão

37.      Figueiredo, J.L., Pereira, M.F.R., Freitas, M.M.A. and Órfão, J.J.M. (1999), Modification of the surface chemistry of activated carbons. Carbon, 37 (9), 1379-1389.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1466

Author Keywords: activated carbon; oxidation; TPD; surface oxygen complexes

Abstract: A NORIT activated carbon was modified by different chemical and thermal treatments (including oxidation in the gas and liquid phases) in order to obtain materials with different surface properties. Several techniques were used to characterize these materials including nitrogen adsorption, chemical and thermal analyses, XPS, TPD and DRIFTS. The results obtained by TPD agree quantitatively with the elemental and proximate analyses of the oxidized materials, and qualitatively with the observations by DRIFTS. A simple deconvolution method is proposed to analyse the TPD spectra, allowing for the quantitative determination of the amount of each functional group on the surface. A multiple gaussian function has been shown to fit the data adequately, the parameters obtained for each fit matching very well the features observed in the experimentally determined TPD spectra. It is shown that gas phase oxidation of the carbon increases mainly the concentration of hydroxyl and carbonyl surface groups, while oxidations in the liquid phase increase especially the concentration of carboxylic acids. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses:

University of Porto, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials, P-4099 Oporto, Portugal.

Present addresses:

J.L. Figueiredo: University of Porto, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials, P-4099 Oporto, Portugal. E-mail: jlfig@fe.up.pt

M.F.R. Pereira:

M.M.A. Freitas:

J.J.M. Órfão:

Reprint Address: Figueiredo, JL, University of Porto, Fac Engn, Dept Engn Quim, Lab Catalise & Mat, P-4099 Oporto, Portugal.

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


John Chmiola

Gleb Yushin

Yury Gogotsi

Cristelle Portet

P. Simon

P.L. Taberna

38.      Chmiola, J., Yushin, G., Gogotsi, Y., Portet, C., Simon, P. and Taberna, P.L. (2006), Anomalous increase in carbon capacitance at pore sizes less than 1 nanometer. Science, 313 (5794), 1760-1763.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1448

Abstract: Carbon supercapacitors, which are energy storage devices that use ion adsorption on the surface of highly porous materials to store charge, have numerous advantages over other power-source technologies, but could realize further gains if their electrodes were properly optimized. Studying the effect of the pore size on capacitance could potentially improve performance by maximizing the electrode surface area accessible to electrolyte ions, but until recently, no studies had addressed the lower size limit of accessible pores. Using carbide-derived carbon, we generated pores with average sizes from 0.6 to 2.25 nanometer and studied double-layer capacitance in an organic electrolyte. The results challenge the long-held axiom that pores smaller than the size of solvated electrolyte ions are incapable of contributing to charge storage.

Addresses:

Department of Materials Science and Engineering and A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Universite´ Paul Sabatier, CIRIMAT, UMR CNRS 5085, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4, France.

Present addresses:

John Chmiola:

Gleb Yushin: Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Atlanta, USA. E-mail: yushin@gatech.edu

Yury Gogotsi: Drexel University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Philadelphia, USA. E-mail: gogotsi@drexel.edu

Cristelle Portet:

P. Simon: Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III, Centre Inter-universitaire de Recherche et d'Ingénierie en Matériaux (CIRIMAT), France

P. L. Taberna: European Space Agency, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

Reprint Address: Gogotsi, Y (reprint author), Drexel Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA. E-mail Addresseses: gogotsi@drexel.edu

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Kevin L. Prime

George M. Whitesides

2005 Nobel Laureates Predictions

39.      Prime, K.L. and Whitesides, G.M. (1991), Self-assembled organic monolayers - model systems for studying adsorption of proteins at surfaces. Science, 252 (5009): 1164-1167.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1442

Abstract: Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of omega-functionalized long-chain alkanethiolates on gold films are excellent model systems with which to study the interactions of proteins with organic surfaces. Monolayers containing mixtures of hydrophobic (methyl-terminated) and hydrophilic [hydroxyl-, maltose-, and hexa(ethylene glycol)-terminated] alkanethiols can be tailored to select specific degrees of adsorption: the amount of protein adsorbed varies monotonically with the composition of the monolayer. The hexa(ethylene glycol)-terminated SAMs are the most effective in resisting protein adsorption. The ability to create interfaces with similar structures and well-defined compositions should make it possible to test hypotheses concerning protein adsorption.

Addresses: Harvard Univ, Dept Chem, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

Present addresses:

Prime, KL:

George M. Whitesides: Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Email: gwhitesides@gmwgroup.harvard.edu

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Hiroyasu Furukawa

Nakeun Ko

Yong Bok Go

Naoki Aratani

Sang Beom Choi

Eunwoo Choi

A. Özgür Yazaydin

Randall Q. Snurr

Michael O’Keeffe

Jaheon Kim

Omar M. Yaghi

2010 Nobel Laureates Predictions

 

40.      Furukawa, H., Ko, N., Go, Y.B., Aratani, N., Choi, S.B., Choi, E., Yazaydin, A.O., Snurr, R.Q., O’Keeffe, M., Kim, J. and Yaghi, O.M. (2010), Ultrahigh porosity in metal-organic frameworks. Science, 329 (5990), 424-428.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1415

Abstract: Crystalline solids with extended non-interpenetrating three-dimensional crystal structures were synthesized that support well-defined pores with internal diameters of up to 48 angstroms. The Zn(4)O(CO(2))(6) unit was joined with either one or two kinds of organic link, 4,4’,4”-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris (ethyne-2,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BTE), 4,4’,44”-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BBC), 4,4’,44”-benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tribenzoate (BTB)/2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate (NDC), and BTE/biphenyl-4,4’-dicarboxylate (BPDC), to give four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MOF-180, -200, -205, and -210, respectively. Members of this series of MOFs show exceptional porosities and gas (hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide) uptake capacities. For example, MOF-210 has Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Langmuir surface areas of 6240 and 10,400 square meters per gram, respectively, and a total carbon dioxide storage capacity of 2870 milligrams per gram. The volume-specific internal surface area of MOF-210 (2060 square meters per cubic centimeter) is equivalent to the outer surface of nanoparticles (3-nanometer cubes) and near the ultimate adsorption limit for solid materials.

Addresses:

Nakeun Ko: Soongsil Univ, Dept Chem, Seoul 156743, South Korea

Sang Beom Choi: Soongsil Univ, Dept Chem, Seoul 156743, South Korea

Jaheon Kim: Soongsil Univ, Dept Chem, Seoul 156743, South Korea

Hiroyasu Furukawa: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Calif NanoSyst Inst, Ctr Reticular Chem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA

Yong Bok Go: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Calif NanoSyst Inst, Ctr Reticular Chem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA

Naoki Aratani: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Calif NanoSyst Inst, Ctr Reticular Chem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA

Eunwoo Choi: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Calif NanoSyst Inst, Ctr Reticular Chem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA

Michael O’Keeffe: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Calif NanoSyst Inst, Ctr Reticular Chem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA

Omar M. Yaghi: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Calif NanoSyst Inst, Ctr Reticular Chem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA

Hiroyasu Furukawa: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Chem & Biochem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

Yong Bok Go: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Chem & Biochem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

Naoki Aratani: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Chem & Biochem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

Eunwoo Choi: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Chem & Biochem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

Michael O’Keeffe: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Chem & Biochem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

Omar M. Yaghi: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Chem & Biochem, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

A. Özgür Yazaydin: Northwestern Univ, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Evanston, IL 60208 USA.

Randall Q. Snurr: Northwestern Univ, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Evanston, IL 60208 USA.

Omar M. Yaghi: Univ Calif Los Angeles, Inst Genom & Prote, Dept Energy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.

Present addresses:

Hiroyasu Furukawa: Department of Chemistry, University of California, 636 Latimer Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. E-mail: furukawa@berkeley.edu

Nakeun Ko: Department of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul, South Korea.

Yong Bok Go: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA

Naoki Aratani: University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Sang Beom Choi: Soongsil University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea.

Eunwoo Choi: Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.

A. Özgür Yazaydin: Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA.

Randall Q. Snurr: Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA.

Michael O’Keeffe: Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

Jaheon Kim: Department of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul, South Korea.

Omar M. Yaghi: University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA. E-mail: yaghi@berkeley.edu

Reprint Address: Kim, J (reprint author), Soongsil Univ, Dept Chem, Seoul 156743, South Korea. E-mail: jaheon@ssu.ac.kr; yaghi@chem.ucla.edu

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


S. Alexander

41.      Alexander, S. (1977), Adsorption of chain molecules with a polar head a-scaling description. Journal de Physique, 38 (8), 983-987.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1383

Addresses: Physique de la Matière Condensée, Collège de France, 11, pl. Marcelin-Berthelot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France

Present addresses:

S. Alexander:

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Physics


Stellan Hjertén

42.      Hjertén, S. (1985), High-performance electrophoresis: Elimination of electroendosmosis and solute adsorption. Journal of Chromatography A, 347 (2), 191-198.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1360

Reprint Address: Hjertén, S, Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Institute of Biochemistry, POB 576, S-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.

Present addresses:

Stellan Hjertén: Uppsala University, Department of Biochemistry & Organic Chemistry, Uppsala, Sweden. E-mail: Stellan.Hjerten@biorg.uu.se

Web of Science Category: Analytical Chemistry


Tewodros Asefa

Mark J. MacLachlan

Neil Coombs

Geoffrey A. Ozin

43.      Asefa, T., MacLachlan, M.J., Coombs, N. and Ozin, G.A. (1999), Periodic mesoporous organosilicas with organic groups inside the channel walls. Nature, 402 (6764), 867-871.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1344

Abstract: Surfactant-mediated synthesis methods have attracted much interest for the production of inorganic mesoporous materials, which can, on removal of the surfactant template, incorporate polymeric, organic, inorganic and organometallic 'guests' in their pores(1,2). These materials-initially made of silica(3-5), but now also available in the form of other oxides(6-9), sulphides(10,11), phosphates(12) and metals(13)-could find application in fields ranging from catalysis, adsorption and sensing technology to nanoelectronics. The extension of surfactant-mediated synthesis to produce inorganic-organic hybrid material (that is, materials that contain organic groups as an integral part of their framework structure) promises access to an even wider range of application possibilities. Such hybrid materials have been produced in the form of amorphous silicates (xerogels) that indeed display unique properties different to those of the individual components(14-20), but their random networks with broad pore-size distributions severely limit the shape and size selectivity of these materials. Mesoporous hybrid materials with periodic frameworks have been synthesized, but the organic groups are all terminally bonded to the pore surface, rather than incorporated into the pore walls(21-26). Here we describe a periodic mesoporous organosilica containing bridge-bonded ethene groups directly integrated into the silica framework. We are able to solvent-extract and ion-exchange the surfactant templates to create a stable and periodic mesoporous ethenesilica with high surface area and ethene groups that are readily accessible for chemical reaction. Recent syntheses of similar periodic mesoporous organosilicas(27,28) and the ability to incorporate a variety of bridging organic and organometallic species raise the prospect of being able to fuse organic synthesis and inorganic materials chemistry to generate new materials with interesting chemical, mechanical electronic, optical and magnetic properties.

Addresses: Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, 80 St George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3H6, Canada

Present addresses:

Tewodros Asefa:

Mark J. MacLachlan: University of British Columbia, Department of Chemistry, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1, Canada. E-mail: mmaclach@chem.ubc.ca

Neil Coombs:

Geoffrey A. Ozin: Materials Chemistry and Nanochemistry Research Group, Center for Inorganic and Polymeric Nanomaterials, Chemistry Department

80 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6, Canada E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca

Reprint Address: Geoffrey A. Ozin (reprint author), Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, 80 St George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3H6, Canada

E-mail Addresses: gozin@alchemy.chem.utoronto.ca

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Jacob Sagiv

44.      Sagiv, J. (1980), Organized monolayers by adsorption. 1. Formation and structure of oleophobic mixed monolayers on solid surfaces. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 102 (1), 92-98.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1308

Present addresses:

Jacob Sagiv: Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel

E-mail: jacob.sagiv@weizmann.ac.il

Reprint Address: Sagiv, J, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Karl Friedrich Bonhoeffer Institute, Molek System Aufbau Abteilung, D-3400 Gottingen, Federal Republic of Germany.

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Vojislav R. Stamenkovic

Bongjin Simon Mun

Matthias Arenz

Karl J.J. Mayrhofer

Christopher A. Lucas

Guofeng Wang

Philip N. Ross

Nenad M. Marković

45.      Stamenkovic, V.R., Mun, B.S., Arenz, M., Mayrhofer, K.J.J., Lucas, C.A., Wang, G.F., Ross, P.N. and Marković, N.M. (2007), Trends in electrocatalysis on extended and nanoscale Pt-bimetallic alloy surfaces. Nature Materials, 6 (3), 241-247.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1288

Author Keywords:

Abstract: One of the key objectives in fuel-cell technology is to improve and reduce Pt loading as the oxygen-reduction catalyst. Here, we show a fundamental relationship in electrocatalytic trends on Pt(3)M (M = Ni, Co, Fe, Ti, V) surfaces between the experimentally determined surface electronic structure (the d-band centre) and activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction. This relationship exhibits 'volcano-type' behaviour, where the maximum catalytic activity is governed by a balance between adsorption energies of reactive intermediates and surface coverage by spectator (blocking) species. The electrocatalytic trends established for extended surfaces are used to explain the activity pattern of Pt(3)M nanocatalysts as well as to provide a fundamental basis for the catalytic enhancement of cathode catalysts. By combining simulations with experiments in the quest for surfaces with desired activity, an advanced concept in nanoscale catalyst engineering has been developed.

Addresses:

Argonne Natl Lab, Div Mat Sci, Argonne, IL 60439 USA.

 Univ Calif Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Div Mat Sci, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.

 Hanyang Univ, Dept Appl Phys, Ansan 426791, Kyunggi Do, South Korea.

 Tech Univ Munich, D-80333 Munich, Germany.

 Univ Liverpool, Dept Phys, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool L69 7ZE, Merseyside, England.

 Univ S Carolina, Dept Chem & Phys, Aiken, SC 29801 USA.

Present addresses:

Vojislav R. Stamenkovic: Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois, United States

Bongjin Simon Mun: Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Gwangju, South Korea

Matthias Arenz: University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry, Copenhagen, Denmark

Karl J.J. Mayrhofer: Max Planck Institute for Iron Research GmbH, Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Düsseldorf, Germany

Christopher A Lucas: University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool, United Kingdom

Guofeng Wang: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Philip N. Ross: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Materials Science and Engineering , Berkeley, CA, United States

Nenad M. Marković: Argonne National Laboratory, MSD, Lemont, Illinois, United States

Reprint Address: Stamenkovic, VR (reprint author), Argonne Natl Lab, Div Mat Sci, 9700 S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 USA.

E-mail Addresseses: vrstamenkovic@anl.gov; nmmarkovic@anl.gov

Web of Science Category: Chemistry, Physical; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Physics, Applied; Physics, Condensed Matter


Shinji Inagaki

Shiyou Guan

Yoshiaki Fukushima

Tetsu Ohsuna

Osamu Terasaki

46.      Inagaki, S., Guan, S., Fukushima, Y., Ohsuna, T. and Terasaki, O. (1999), Novel mesoporous materials with a uniform distribution of organic groups and inorganic oxide in their frameworks. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 121 (41), 9611-9614.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1277

Abstract: Novel organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous materials have been synthesized, in which organic and inorganic oxide moieties are distributed homogeneously at the molecular level in the framework, forming a covalently bonded network. They are highly ordered at the mesoscale, with two- and three-dimensional hexagonal symmetries and well-defined external morphologies. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show a uniform pore-size distribution with pore diameters of 31 and 27 Angstrom, and high surface areas of 750 and 1170 m(2)/g. The synthetic procedure to polymerize the organosilane monomer containing two trialkoxysilyl groups in the presence of surfactant can be applied to the synthesis of a variety of highly ordered organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous materials.

Addresses:

Toyota Cent Res & Dev Labs Inc, Nagakute, Aichi 4801192, Japan

Tohoku Univ, Inst Mat Res, Sendai, Miyagi 9808577, Japan

Tohoku Univ, JST, CREST, Sendai, Miyagi 9808578, Japan

Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Sci, Dept Phys, Sendai, Miyagi 9808578, Japan

Present addresses:

Shinji Inagaki:

Shiyou Guan: East China University of Science and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China. E-mail: syguan@ecust.edu.cn

Yoshiaki Fukushima:

Tetsu Ohsuna:

Osamu Terasaki: Department of Physical, Inorganic & Structural Chemistry at the University of Stockholm in Sweden.

Reprint Address: Inagaki, S (reprint author), Toyota Cent Res & Dev Labs Inc, 41-1 Aza Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 4801192, Japan. E-mail: inagaki@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Gianluca Giovannetti

P.A. Khomyakov

G. Brocks

V.M. Karpan

Jeroen van den Brink

P.J. Kelly

47.      Giovannetti, G., Khomyakov, P.A., Brocks, G., Karpan, V.M., van den Brink, J. and Kelly, P.J. (2008), Doping graphene with metal contacts. Physical Review Letters, 101 (2), Article Number: 026803.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1268

Abstract: Making devices with graphene necessarily involves making contacts with metals. We use density functional theory to study how graphene is doped by adsorption on metal substrates and find that weak bonding on Al, Ag, Cu, Au, and Pt, while preserving its unique electronic structure, can still shift the Fermi level with respect to the conical point by similar to 0.5 eV. At equilibrium separations, the crossover from p-type to n-type doping occurs for a metal work function of similar to 5.4 eV, a value much larger than the graphene work function of 4.5 eV. The numerical results for the Fermi level shift in graphene are described very well by a simple analytical model which characterizes the metal solely in terms of its work function, greatly extending their applicability.

Addresses:

[Giovannetti, G.; van den Brink, J.] Leiden Univ, Inst Lorentz Theoret Phys, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands.

 [Giovannetti, G.; Khomyakov, P. A.; Brocks, G.; Karpan, V. M.; Kelly, P. J.] Univ Twente, Fac Sci & Technol, NL-7500 AE Enschede, Netherlands.

 [Giovannetti, G.; Khomyakov, P. A.; Brocks, G.; Karpan, V. M.; Kelly, P. J.] Univ Twente, MESA Inst Nanotechnol, NL-7500 AE Enschede, Netherlands.

 [van den Brink, J.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Mol & Mat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Present addresses:

Gianluca Giovannetti: Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati di Trieste, Trst, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy. E-mail: ggiovann@sissa.it, gianluca.giovannetti@gmail.com

P.A. Khomyakov: Universiteit Twente, Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands

G. Brocks: Universiteit Twente, Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands

V.M. Karpan: Universiteit Twente, Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands

Jeroen van den Brink: Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Institute for Theoretical Solid State Physics, Dresden, Germany

P.J. Kelly: Universiteit Twente, Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands

Reprint Address: Giovannetti, G (reprint author), Leiden Univ, Inst Lorentz Theoret Phys, POB 9506, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands.

Web of Science Category: Physics, Multidisciplinary


Jan M.H.M. Scheutjens (Deceased)

Gerard J. Fleer

48.      Scheutjens, J.M.H.M. and Fleer, G.J. (1979), Statistical-theory of the adsorption of interacting chain molecules. 1. Partition-function, segment density distribution, and adsorption-isotherms. Journal of Physical Chemistry, 83 (12), 1619-1635.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1262

Present addresses:

J.M.H.M. Scheutjens:

G.J. Fleer:

Reprint Address: Scheutjens, Jmhm, Laboratory for Physical and Colloid Chemistry, De Dreijen 6, Wageningen, Netherlands.

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry


Jörg Neugebauer

Matthias Scheffler

49.      Neugebauer, J. and Scheffler, M. (1992), Adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions of Na and K adlayers on Al(111). Physical Review B, 46 (24), 16067-16080.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1235

Abstract: We present total-energy, force, and electronic-structure calculations for Na and K adsorbed in various geometries on an Al(111) surface. The calculations apply density-functional theory together with the low-density approximation and the ab initio pseudopotential formalism. Two adsorbate meshes, namely (square-root 3 X square-root 3)R30-degrees and (2 X 2), are considered and for each of them the geometry of the adlayer relative to the substrate is varied over a wide range of possibilities. By total-energy minimization we determine stable and metastable geometries. For Na we find for both adsorbate meshes that the ordering of the calculated binding energies per adatom is such that the substitutional geometry, where each Na atom replaces a surface Al atom, is most favorable and the on-top position is most unfavorable. The (square-root 3 X square-root 3)R30-degrees structure has a lower energy than the (2 X 2) structure. This is shown to be a substrate effect and not an effect of the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction. In contrast to the results for Na, we find for the (square-root 3 X square-root 3)R30-degrees K adsorption that the calculated adsorption energies for the on-top, threefold hollow, and substitutional sites are equal within the accuracy of our calculation, which is +/-0.03 eV. The similarity of the energies of the on-surface adsorption sites is explained as a consequence of the bigger size of K which implies that the adatom experiences a rather small substrate electron-density corrugation. Therefore for potassium the on-top and hollow sites are close in energy already for the unrelaxed Al(111) substrate. Because the relaxation energy of the on-top site is larger than that of the threefold hollow site both sites receive practically the same adsorption energy. The unexpected possibility of surface-substitutional sites is explained as a consequence of the ionic nature of the bonding which, at higher coverages, can develop strongest when the adatom can dive into the substrate as deep as possible. The interesting result of the studied systems is that the difference in bond strengths between the “normal” and substitutional geometries is sufficiently large to kick out a surface Al atom.

Addresses: Fritz Haber Institut der Max Planck Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D 100-0 Berlin 33, Germany

Present addresses:

Jörg Neugebauer: Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlín, Berlin, Germany

Matthias Scheffler: Max Planck Institute for Iron Research GmbH, Düsseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. E-mail: scheffler@fhi-berlin.mpg.de

Reprint Address: Neugebauer, J (reprint author), Max Planck Gesell, Fritz Haber Inst, Faradayweg 4-6, W-1000 Berlin 33, Germany. E-mail: scheffler@fhi-berlin.mpg.de

Web of Science Category: Physics, Condensed Matter


Yunfeng Lu

Rahul Ganguli

Celeste A. Drewien

Mark T. Anderson

C. Jeffrey Brinker

Weilang Gong

Yongxing Guo

Hermes Soyez

Bruce Dunn

Michael H. Huang

Jeffrey I. Zink

 

50.      Lu, Y.F., Ganguli, R., Drewien, C.A., Anderson, M.T., Brinker, C.J., Gong, W.L., Guo, Y.X., Soyez, H., Dunn, B., Huang, M.H. and Zink, J.I. (1997), Continuous formation of supported cubic and hexagonal mesoporous films by sol gel dip-coating. Nature, 389 (6649), 364-368.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1219

Abstract: Thin films of surfactant-templated mesoporous materials(1,2) could find applications in membrane-based separations, selective catalysis and sensors. Above the critical micelle concentration of a bulk silica-surfactant solution, films of mesophases with hexagonally packed one-dimensional channels can be formed at solid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces(3-5). But this process is slow and the supported films(3,5) are granular and with the pore channels oriented parallel to the substrate surface, so that transport across the films is not facilitated by the pores. Ogawa(6,7) has reported a rapid spin-coating procedure for making transparent mesoporous films, but their formation mechanism, microstructure and pore accessibility have not been elucidated. Here we report a sol-gel-based dip-coating method for the rapid synthesis of continuous mesoporous thin films on a solid substrate. The influence of the substrate generates film mesostructures that have no bulk counterparts, such as composites with incipient liquid-crystalline order of the surfactant-silica phase. We are also able to form mesoporous films of the cubic phase, in which the pores are connected in a three-dimensional network that guarantees their accessibility from the film surface. We demonstrate and quantify this accessibility using a surface-acoustic-wave nitrogen-adsorption technique. We use fluorescence depolarization to monitor the evolution of the mesophase in situ, and see a progression through a sequence of lamellar to cubic to hexagonal structures that has not previously been reported.

Addresses:

Yunfeng Lu: Sandia National Laboratories and The University of New Mexico/NSF Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, The Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University Blvd SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA; E-mail: luucla@ucla.edu

Rahul Ganguli: Sandia National Laboratories and The University of New Mexico/NSF Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, The Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University Blvd SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA

Celeste A. Drewien: Sandia National Laboratories and The University of New Mexico/NSF Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, The Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University Blvd SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA

Mark T. Anderson: Sandia National Laboratories and The University of New Mexico/NSF Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, The Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University Blvd SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA

C. Jeffrey Brinker: Sandia National Laboratories and The University of New Mexico/NSF Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, The Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University Blvd SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA

Weilang Gong: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA

Yongxing Guo: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA

Hermes Soyez: Departments of Materials Science, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1595, USA

Bruce Dunn: Departments of Materials Science , University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1595, USA

Michael H. Huang: Departments of Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1595, USA

Jeffrey I. Zink: Departments of Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1595, USA

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Kevin L. Prime

George M. Whitesides

2005 Nobel Laureates Predictions

51.      Prime, K.L. and Whitesides, G.M. (1993), Adsorption of proteins onto surfaces containing end-attached oligo(ethylene oxide): A model system using self-assembled monolayers. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 115 (23), 10714-10721.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1215

Abstract: This paper reports a study of the adsorption of four proteins-fibrinogen, lysozyme, pyruvate kinase, and RNAse A-to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. The SAMs examined were derived from thiols of the structure HS(CH2)10R, where R was CH3, CH2OH, and oligo(ethylene oxide). Monolayers that contained a sufficiently large mole fraction of alkanethiolate groups terminated in oligo(ethylene oxide) chains resisted the kinetically irreversible, nonspecific adsorption of all four proteins. Longer chains of oligo(ethylene oxide) were resistant at lower mole fractions in the monolayer. Resistance to the adsorption of proteins increased with the length of the oligo(ethylene oxide) chain: the smallest mole fraction of chains that prevented adsorption was proportional to n-0.4, where n represents the number of ethylene oxide units per chain. Termination of the oligo(ethylene oxide) chains with a methoxy group instead of a hydroxyl group had little or no effect on the amount of protein adsorbed. The amount of pyruvate kinase that adsorbed to mixed SAMs containing hexa(ethylene oxide)-terminated chains depended upon the temperature. When the mole fraction of oligo(ethylene oxide) groups in the monolayer was below the level needed to prevent adsorption, more pyruvate kinase adsorbed to the monolayer at 37-degrees-C than at 25-degrees-C. No difference was observed between adsorption at 25 and 4-degrees-C.

Addresses:

Department of Chemistry, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138

Present addresses:

Kevin L. Prime:

George M. Whitesides: Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA, Email: gwhitesides@gmwgroup.harvard.edu

Reprint Address: George M. Whitesides, Department of Chemistry, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Mohammad F. Islam

E. Rojas

Daniel M. Bergey

A.T. Charlie Johnson

Arjun G. Yodh

52.      Islam, M.F., Rojas, E., Bergey, D.M., Johnson, A.T. and Yodh, A.G. (2003), High weight fraction surfactant solubilization of single-wall carbon nanotubes in water. Nano Letters, 3 (2), 269-273.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1207

Abstract: We report a simple process to solubilize high weight fraction single-wall carbon nanotubes in water by the nonspecific physical adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. The diameter distribution of nanotubes in the dispersion, measured by atomic force microscopy, showed that even at 20 mg/mL similar to63 +/- 5% of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles exfoliated into single tubes. A measure of the length distribution of the nanotubes showed that our dispersion technique reduced nanotube fragmentation.

Addresses: Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 S. 33rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 USA.

Reprint Address:

Mohammad F. Islam: Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, PA, USA. E-mail: islam@physics.upenn.edu

E. Rojas:

Daniel M. Bergey:

A.T. Charlie Johnson: University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PA, USA. E-mail: cjohnson@physics.upenn.edu

Arjun G. Yodh: Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA. E-mail: yodh@physics.upenn.edu

Reprint Address: Islam, MF (reprint author), Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 S. 33rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 USA. E-mail: islam@physics.upenn.edu

Web of Science Category: Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Chemistry, Physical; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Physics, Applied; Physics, Condensed Matter


Yuri Lvov

Katsuhiko Ariga

Izumi Ichinose

Toyoki Kunitake

53.      Lvov, Y., Ariga, K., Ichinose, I. and Kunitake, T. (1995), Assembly of multicomponent protein films by means of electrostatic layer-by-layer adsorption. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 117 (22), 6117-6123.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1195

Abstract: Multilayer films which contain ordered layers of more than one protein species were assembled by means of alternate electrostatic adsorption mostly with positively charged poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) or with negatively charged poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Water-soluble proteins used are cytochrome c (Cyt), myoglobin (Mb), lysozyme (Lys), histone f3, hemoglobin (Hb), glucoamylase (GA), and glucose oxidase (GOD). Charged protein layers formed multilayers with linear polymers acting as glue or filler. The assembly was monitored by a quartz crystal microbalance and UV spectroscopy. Linear film growth was observed up to at least 25 molecular layers. The assembly of Mb and Lys, both positively-charged, was realized in alternation with PSS in the form of {PEI/PSS + (Mb/PSS)(2) + (Mb/PSS/Lys/PSS)(4)}. The assembly of oppositely-charged (at pH 6.5) Lys and GOD consists from Lys and GOD layers separated by a polycation/polyanion bilayer: {PEI/PSS/PEI + (PSS/Lys)(2) + PSS/PEI + (GOD/PEI)(6)}. Hb was assembled as ''positive'' unit at pH 4.5 (in alternation with PSS) and as ''negative'' unit at pH 9.2 (in alternation with PEI). A multilayer consisting of alternating montmorillonite, PEI, and GOD layers was also assembled. These biomolecular architecture open a way to construct artificially orchestrated protein systems that can carry out complex enzymic reactions.

Addresses:

Res Dev Corp Japan, Supermolecules Project, Kurume, Fukuoka 830, Japan

Kyushu University, Faculty of Engineering, Fukuoka 812, Japan

Present addresses:

Yuri Lvov: Tolbert Pipes Eminent Endowed Chair on Micro and Nanosystems, Institute for Micromanufacturing, Louisiana Tech University, 911 Hergot Ave., Ruston, LA 71272, USA. E-mail: ylvov@latech.edu

Katsuhiko Ariga: Supermolecules Group, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba. Japan E-mail: ARIGA.Katsuhiko@nims.go.jp

Izumi Ichinose: Polymer Materials Unit, Advanced Key Technologies Division, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan. Email: ICHINOSE.Izumi@nims.go.jp

Toyoki Kunitake: Frontier Research System, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Japan. E-mail: kunitake@ruby.ocn.ne.jp

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Seimei Shiratori

Michael F. Rubner

54.      Shiratori, S.S. and Rubner, M.F. (2000), pH-dependent thickness behavior of sequentially adsorbed layers of weak polyelectrolytes. Macromolecules, 33 (11), 4213-4219.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1176

Abstract: A detailed study of the role that solution pH plays in the layer-by-layer processing of the weak polyelectrolytes poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochoride) was carried out. It was found that dramatically different polymer adsorption behavior is observed as one systematically increases (or decreases) the charge density of a weak polyelectrolyte including transitions from very thick adsorbed layers (ca. 80 Angstrom) to very thin adsorbed layers (ca. 4 Angstrom) over a very narrow pH range. By controlling pH, it is possible to vary the thickness of an adsorbed polycation or polyanion layer from 5 to 80 Angstrom. In addition, control over the bulk and surface composition of the resultant multilayer thin films is readily achieved via simple pH adjustments. These studies have provided new insights into the polyelectrolyte sequential adsorption process and have already opened up some interesting technological applications.

Addresses: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Department of Applied Physics and Physico-informatics, Keio University, Yokohama 223, Japan.

Present addresses:

Seimei Shiratori: Keio University, Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Japan. E-mail:

Michael F. Rubner: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. E-mail: rubner@mit.edu

Reprint Address: Rubner, MF (reprint author), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. E-mail: rubner@mit.edu

Web of Science Category: Polymer Science


Gero Decher

Jong-Dal Hong

55.      Decher, G. and Hong, J.D. (1991), Buildup of ultrathin multilayer films by a self-assembly process. I. Consecutive adsorption of anionic and cationic bipolar amphiphiles on charged surfaces. Makromolekulare Chemie-Macromolecular Symposia, 46, 321-327.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1160

Abstract: An anionic and a cationic bipolar amphiphile containing rigid biphenyl cores were synthesized. The compounds were dissolved in a mixture of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and water and pure water, respectively. When a solid substrate with a positively charged planar surface is immersed in the solution containing the negatively charged bipolar amphiphile, a monolayer of the amphiphile is adsorbed and due to its bipolar structure the surface charge is reversed. After rinsing in pure water the substrate is immersed in the solution containing the positively charged bipolar amphiphile. Again a monolayer is adsorbed but now the original surface charge is restored. By repeating both steps in a cyclic fashion alternating multilayer assemblies of both compounds are obtained. It is demonstrated that multilayer films, composed of at least 35 consecutively alternating layers, which corresponds to a total film thickness of 170 nm can be assembled.

Addresses:

Present addresses:

Gero Decher: Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Mainz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Jong-Dal Hong: Department of Chemistry, University of Incheon, Yeonsu-gu, Song Do Dong, 402-772 Incheon, South Korea. E-mail: hong5506@incheon.ac.kr or hong5506@hanmail.net (Emergency)

Reprint Address: Decher, Gero (reprint author), Univ Mainz, Inst Phys Chem, Welder Weg 11, W-6500 Mainz, Germany

Web of Science Category: Polymer Science


Bjørk Hammer

Jens K. Nørskov

56.      Hammer, B. and Nørskov, J.K. (1995), Why gold is the noblest of all the metals. Nature, 376 (6537), 238-240.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1146

Abstract: THE unique role that gold plays in society is to a large extent related to the fact that it is the most noble of all metals: it is the least reactive metal towards atoms or molecules at the interface with a gas or a liquid. The inertness of gold does not reflect a general inability to form chemical bonds, however-gold forms very stable alloys with many other metals. To understand the nobleness of gold, we have studied a simple surface reaction, the dissociation of H-2 On the surface of gold and of three other metals (copper, nickel and platinum) that lie close to it in the periodic table. We present self-consistent density-functional calculations of the activation barriers and chemisorption energies which clearly illustrate that nobleness is related to two factors: the degree of filling of the antibonding states on adsorption, and the degree of orbital overlap with the adsorbate. These two factors, which determine both the strength of the adsorbate-metal interaction and the energy barrier for dissociation, operate together to the maximal detriment of adsorbate binding and subsequent reactivity on gold.

Addresses:

Joint Res Ctr Atom Technol, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305, Japan.

Present addresses:

Reprint Address: Hammer, B (reprint author), Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Phys, Ctr Atom Scale Mat Phys, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark.

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


E. Laviron