Trend Research Centre


1000 CLUB OF CHINA (INDEPENDENT)

1000 club of China (Including China, Hong Kong, and Macao)

Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) --1900-present

There were 47,720,884 publications which included 33,073,505 articles in the SCI-EXPANDED from 1900

China published 2,561,422 papers which included 2,348,149 articles

China published 1,949,816 independent papers (non-internationally collaborative papers) which included 1,794,239 independent articles.

52 China independent articles have been cited at least 1,000 times from Web of Science Core Collection.

Web of Science Core Collection, Data last updated 11 January 2017

 

Figure 1. Non-internationally collaborative articles (TC ³ 1,000) by year

 

Figure 2. Non-internationally collaborative articles (TC ³ 1,000) by total citations

 

Figure 3. Non-internationally collaborative articles (TC ³ 1,000) by citations per year

 

Figure 4. Non-internationally collaborative articles (TC ³ 1,000) by total citations in 2016

 

Figure 5. Non-internationally collaborative article lives (C2116 > 300)

 

Top one citation in 2008 (203 times), 2009 (311 times), 2010 (320 times), 2011 (431 times), 2012 (443 times), 2013 (578 times), 2015 (757 times), 2016 (851 times)

Yuh-Shan Ho

何玉山

Gordon McKay

 

1.          Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (1999), Pseudo-second order model for sorption processes. Process Biochemistry, 34 (5), 451-465.

ESI

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 5003

Abstract: A literature review of the use of sorbents and biosorbents to treat polluted aqueous effluents containing dyes/organics or metal ions has been conducted. Over 70 systems have been reported since 1984 and over 43 of these reported the mechanism as being a pseudo-first order kinetic mechanism. Three sorption kinetic models are presented in this paper and have been used to test 11 of the literature systems previously reported as first order kinetics and one system previously reported as a second order process. In all 12 systems, the highest correlation coefficients were obtained for the pseudo-second order kinetic model. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Author Keywords: kinetics; sorption; pseudo-second order

KeyWords Plus: BIOGAS RESIDUAL SLURRY; INDUSTRY WASTE-WATER; SPHAGNUM MOSS PEAT; PEANUT HULL CARBON; LOW-COST ADSORBENT; AQUEOUS-SOLUTION; FLY-ASH; FE(III)/CR(III) HYDROXIDE; HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM; COLOR REMOVAL

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Department of Chemical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan, E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Chemical Engineering

Subject Category: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Engineering


Wai Hung Gordon Cheung

张伟雄

Roger B. Rensvold

 

2.          Cheung, G.W. and Rensvold, R.B. (2002), Evaluating goodness-of-fit indexes for testing measurement invariance. Structural Equation Modeling, 9 (2), 233-255.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2729

Abstract: Measurement invariance is usually tested using Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis, which examines the change in the goodness-of-fit index (GFI) when cross-group constraints are imposed on a measurement model. Although many studies have examined the properties of GFI as indicators of overall model fit for single-group data, there have been none to date that examine how GFIs change when between-group constraints are added to a measurement model. The lack of a consensus about what constitutes significant GFI differences places limits on measurement invariance testing.

We examine 20 GFIs based on the minimum fit function. A simulation under the two-group situation was used to examine changes in the GFIs (DeltaGFIs) when invariance constraints were added. Based on the results, we recommend using Deltacomparative fit index, DeltaGamma hat, and DeltaMcDonald’s Noncentrality Index to evaluate measurement invariance. These three DeltaGFIs are independent of both model complexity and sample size, and are not correlated with the overall fit measures. We propose critical values of these DeltaGFIs that indicate measurement invariance.

KeyWords Plus: Confirmatory Factor-Analysis; Structural Equation Models; Cross-Cultural Research; Covariance-Structures; Sample-Size; Self-Concept; Chi-Square; Noncentrality; Equivalence; Statistics

Addresses:

Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Management, Shatin, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

City University of Hong Kong, Department of Management, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Wai Hung Gordon Cheung: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Management, Shatin, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; E-mail: gordonc@cuhk.edu.hk

Roger B. Rensvold:

Reprint Address: Wai Hung Gordon Cheung, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Management, Shatin, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Interdisciplinary Applications Mathematics; Mathematical Methods Social Sciences


Top one citation in 2014 (752 times)

Zhicai He

何志才

Chengmei Zhong

仲成美

Shijian Su

苏仕健

Miao Xu

徐苗

Hongbin Wu

吴宏滨

Yong Cao

曹镛院士

3.          He, Z.C., Zhong, C.M., Su, S.J., Xu, M., Wu, H.B. and Cao, Y. (2012), Enhanced power-conversion efficiency in polymer solar cells using an inverted device structure. Nature Photonics, 6 (9), 591-595.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 2314

Abstract: Polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells (PSCs) are currently attracting a great deal of attention and gaining increasing importance, having already shown great promise as renewable, lightweight and low-cost energy sources(1-4). Recently, the power-conversion efficiency of state-of-the-art PSCs has exceeded 8% in the scientific literature(5). However, to find viable applications for this emerging photovoltaic technology, further enhancements in the efficiency towards 10% (the threshold for commercial applications) are urgently required(6). Here, we demonstrate highly efficient PSCs with a certified efficiency of 9.2% using an inverted structure, which simultaneously offers ohmic contact for photogenerated charge-carrier collection and allows optimum photon harvest in the device. Because of the ease of use and drastic boost in efficiency provided by this device structure, this discovery could find use in fully exploiting the potential of various material systems, and also open up new opportunities to improve PSCs with a view to achieving an efficiency of 10%.

Addresses:

Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Zhicai He:

Chengmei Zhong:

Shijian Su:

Miao Xu: Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: xumiao4049@gmail.com

Hongbin Wu: Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: hbwu@scut.edu.cn

Yong Cao:

Reprint Address: Hongbin Wu, South China University of Technology, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: hbwu@scut.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Optics; Applied Physics


Lin Feng

冯琳

Shuhong Li

李书宏

 

Yingshun Li

 

 

Huanjun Li

李欢军

 

Lingjuan Zhang

 

Jin Zhai

翟锦

Yanlin Song

宋延林

Biqian Liu

刘必前

Lei Jiang

江雷院士

Dao-ben Zhu

朱道本院士

4.          Feng, L., Li, S.H., Li, Y.S., Li, H.J., Zhang, L.J., Zhai, J., Song, Y.L., Liu, B.Q., Jiang, L. and Zhu, D.B. (2002), Super-hydrophobic surfaces: From natural to artificial. Advanced Materials, 14 (24), 1857-1860.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1954

Abstract: Super-hydrophobic surfaces, with a water contact angle (CA) greater than 150degreesC, have attracted much interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. Recent studies on lotus and rice leaves reveal that a super-hydrophobic surface with both a large CA and small sliding angle (alpha) needs the cooperation of micro- and nanostructure, and the arrangement of the microstructures on this surface can influence the way a water droplet tends to move. These results form the natural world provide a guide for constructing artificial super-hydrophobic surfaces and designing surfaces with controllable wettability. Accordingly, super-hydrophobic surfaces of polymer nanofibers and differently patterned aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT) films have been fabricated.

KeyWords Plus: Carbon Nanotube Films; Water-Repellent

Addresses: Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Chem, Ctr Mol Sci, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Lin Feng: Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: fl@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Shuhong Li:

Yingshun Li: School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100037, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: lish@th.btbu.edu.cn

Huanjun Li:

Lingjuan Zhang:

Jin Zhai: Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: zhaijin@iccas.ac.cn

Yanlin Song: Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: ylsong@iccas.ac.cn

Biqian Liu: Center of Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China E-mail: lbq@iccas.ac.cn

Lei Jiang: Center of Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: jianglei@iccas.ac.cn

Dao-ben Zhu: Center of Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China

Reprint Address: Jiang, Lei, Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Chem, Ctr Mol Sci, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Chemistry, Physical; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Physics, Applied; Physics, Condensed Matter


Yuxi Xu

徐宇曦

Hua Bai

白华

 

Gewu Lu

 

 

Chun Li

李春

Gaoquan Shi

石高全

5.          Xu, Y.X., Bai, H., Lu, G.W., Li, C. and Shi, G.Q. (2008), Flexible graphene films via the filtration of water-soluble noncovalent functionalized graphene sheets. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 130 (18), 5856-5857.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1903

Abstract: Flexible graphene films were prepared by the filtration of water-soluble noncovalently functionalized graphene sheets with pyrenebutyrate. The work presented here will not only open a new way for preparing water-soluble graphene dispersions but also provide a general route for fabricating conducting films based on graphene.

KeyWords Plus: FIELD-EMISSION; GROWTH; TUBULES; MICROTUBULES

Addresses: Tsinghua Univ, Dept Chem, Key Lab Bioorgan Phosphorus Chem & Chem Biol, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Yuxi Xu: Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: xuyuxi@fudan.edu.cn

Hua Bai: Xiamen University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China.E-mail: baihua@xmu.edu.cn

Gewu Lu: Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China.

Chun Li: Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: chunli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Gaoquan Shi: Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: gshi@tsinghua.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Li, C, Tsinghua Univ, Dept Chem, Key Lab Bioorgan Phosphorus Chem & Chem Biol, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China.

E-mail Addresses: chunli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; gshi@tsinghua.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry

Research Areas: Chemistry


Meng-er Huang

萌珥

Yu-chen Ye

叶裕春

 

Shu-rong Chen

陈淑蓉

Jin-ren Chai

蔡敬仁

 

Jia-Xiang Lu

 

 

Lin Zhoa

赵琳

Long-jun Gu

顾龙君

Zhen-yi Wang

王振义院士

6.          Huang, M.E., Ye, Y.C., Chen, S.R., Chai, J.R., Lu, J.X., Zhoa, L., Gu, L.J. and Wang, Z.Y. (1988), Use of all-trans retinoic acid in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Blood, 72 (2), 567-572.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1810

Addresses: Shanghai Second Medical University, Shanghai Institute of Hematology, 280 South Chong-Qing Rd., Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; Shanghai Zhong Shan Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; Shanghai Children’s Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Meng-Er Huang: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR3348 “Genotoxic Stress and Cancer”, 91405 Orsay, France. E-mail: meng-er.huang@curie.fr; meng-er.huang@curie.u-psud.fr

Yu-chen Ye:

Shu-rong Chen:

Jin-ren Chai:

Jia-Xiang Lu:

Lin Zhoa:

Long-jun Gu:

Zhen-yi Wang:

Reprint Address: Wang, Zhen-Yi 280 South Chong-Qing Rd., Shanghai Second Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China.

Web of Science Category: Hematology

Subject Category: Hematology


Jingdong Luo

 

Zhiliang Xie

解志良

 

Jacky W.Y. Lam

 

 

Lin Cheng

 

 

Haiying Chen

 

 

Chengfeng Qiu

 

Hoi Sing Kwok

郭海成

Xiaowei Zhan

占肖卫

Yunqi Liu

刘云圻

Dao-ben Zhu

朱道本院士

Ben Zhong Tang

唐本忠院士

 

7.          Luo, J.D., Xie, Z.L., Lam, J.W.Y., Cheng, L., Chen, H.Y., Qiu, C.F., Kwok, H.S., Zhan, X.W., Liu, Y.Q., Zhu, D.B. and Tang, B.Z. (2001), Aggregation-induced emission of 1-methyl-1,2,3,4,5-pentaphenylsilole. Chemical Communications, 18, 1740-1741.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1792

Abstract: Aggregation greatly boosts emission efficiency of the silole, turning it from a weak luminophor into a strong emitter.

Addresses:

Department of Chemistry, Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Center for Display Research, HKUST, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Jingdong Luo: E-mail: jdluo@u.washington.edu

Zhiliang Xie:

Jacky W.Y. Lam:

Lin Cheng:

Haiying Chen:

Chengfeng Qiu:

Hoi Sing Kwok: Center for Display Research, HKUST, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: eekwok@ust.hk

Xiaowei Zhan: Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: xwzhan@iccas.ac.cn

Yunqi Liu: Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: liuyq@iccas.ac.cn

Daoben Zhu:

Ben Zhong Tang: Department of Chemistry, Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Reprint Address: Ben Zhong Tang, Department of Chemistry, Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: tangbenz@ust.hk

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


 

Zhishen Jia

贾之慎

 

Mengcheng Tang

唐盂成

 

Jianming Wu

邬建敏

8.          Jia, Z., Tang, M.C. and Wu, J.M. (1999), The determination of flavonoid contents in mulberry and their scavenging effects on superoxide radicals. Food Chemistry, 64 (4), 555-559.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1739

Abstract: Flavonoid content of mulberry leaves of 19 varieties of species, determined spectrophotometrically in terms of rutin equivalent, varied from 11.7 to 26.6 mg g(-1) in spring leaves and 9.84 to 29.6 mg g(-1) in autumn leaves. Fresh leaves gave more extract than air-dried or oven-dried ones. HPLC showed that mulberry leaves contain at least four flavonoids, two of which are rutin and quercetin. The percentage superoxide ion scavenged by extracts of mulberry leaves, mulberry tender leaves, mulberry branches and mulberry bark were 46.5, 55.5, 67.5 and 85.5%, respectively, at a concentration of 5 mu g ml(-1). The scavenging effects of most mulberry extracts were greater than those of rutin (52.0%). (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Addresses: Zhejiang Agricultural University, Department of Basic Course, Chemistry Laboratory, Hangzhou 310029, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Reprint Address: Zhishen Jia, Zhejiang Agr Univ, Dept Basic Course, Chem Lab, Hangzhou 310029, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Applied Chemistry; Food Science & Technology; Nutrition & Dietetics


Xian-Hui Chen

陈仙辉

2015 Bernd T. Matthias Prize

Tao Wu

吴涛

Gang Wu

吴刚

 

Rong-Hua Liu

刘荣华

 

Hong Chen

 

 

D.F. Fang

 

9.          Chen, X.H., Wu, T., Wu, G., Liu, R.H., Chen, H. and Fang, D.F. (2008), Superconductivity at 43 K in SmFeAsO1-XFX. Nature, 453 (7196), 761-762.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1737

Abstract: Since the discovery of high- transition- temperature (high-T(c)) superconductivity in layered copper oxides, extensive effort has been devoted to exploring the origins of this phenomenon. A T(c) higher than 40 K (about the theoretical maximum predicted from Bardeen - Cooper - Schrieffer theory(1)), however, has been obtained only in the copper oxide superconductors. The highest reported value for non- copper- oxide bulk superconductivity is T(c) = 39 K in MgB(2) (ref. 2). The layered rare- earth metal oxypnictides LnOFeAs (where Ln is La - Nd, Sm and Gd) are now attracting attention following the discovery of superconductivity at 26 K in the iron-based LaO(1-x)F(x)FeAs (ref. 3). Here we report the discovery of bulk superconductivity in the related compound SmFeAsO(1-x)F(x), which has a ZrCuSiAs-type structure. Resistivity and magnetization measurements reveal a transition temperature as high as 43 K. This provides a new material base for studying the origin of high- temperature superconductivity.

Addresses: [Chen, X. H.; Wu, T.; Wu, G.; Liu, R. H.; Chen, H.; Fang, D. F.] University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei 230026, People’s Republic of China.

[Chen, X. H.; Wu, T.; Wu, G.; Liu, R. H.; Chen, H.; Fang, D. F.] University of Science and Technology of China, Department of Physics, Hefei 230026, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Xian-Hui Chen: Nanjing University, Nan-ching, Jiangsu Sheng, People’s Republic of China.

Tao Wu:

Gang Wu: University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, People’s Republic of China.

Rong-Hua Liu:

Hong Chen:

D.F. Fang: University of Science and Technology of China, Luchow, Anhui Sheng, People’s Republic of China.

Reprint Address: Chen, XH, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei 230026, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: chenxh@ustc.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Xun Wang

王训

 

Jing Zhuang

庄京

Qing Peng

彭卿

Yadong Li

李亚栋院士

10.      Wang, X., Zhuang, J., Peng, Q. and Li, Y.D. (2005), A general strategy for nanocrystal synthesis. Nature, 437 (7055), 121-124.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1722

Abstract: New strategies for materials fabrication are of fundamental importance in the advancement of science and technology(1-12). Organometallic(13,14) and other organic solution phase(15-17) synthetic routes have enabled the synthesis of functional inorganic quantum dots or nanocrystals. These nanomaterials form the building blocks for new bottom-up approaches to materials assembly for a range of uses; such materials also receive attention because of their intrinsic size-dependent properties and resulting applications(18-21). Here we report a unified approach to the synthesis of a large variety of nanocrystals with different chemistries and properties and with low dispersity; these include noble metal, magnetic/ dielectric, semiconducting, rare-earth fluorescent, biomedical, organic optoelectronic semiconducting and conducting polymer nanoparticles. This strategy is based on a general phase transfer and separation mechanism occurring at the interfaces of the liquid, solid and solution phases present during the synthesis. We believe our methodology provides a simple and convenient route to a variety of building blocks for assembling materials with novel structure and function in nanotechnology(13-29).

KeyWords Plus: Single-Crystal Nanowires; Quantum Dots; Nanoparticles; Nanotubes; Superlattices; Oxides

Addresses: Tsinghua University, Department of Chemistry, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

National Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Xun Wang: Tsinghua University, Department of Chemistry, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: wangxun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Jing Zhuang:

Qing Peng: Tsinghua University, Department of Chemistry, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: pengqing@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Yadong Li: Tsinghua University, Department of Chemistry, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: ydli@tsinghua.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Yadong Li, Tsinghua University, Department of Chemistry, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: ydli@tsinghua.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Yuh-Shan Ho

何玉山

Gordon McKay

 

11.      Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (1998), Sorption of dye from aqueous solution by peat. Chemical Engineering Journal, 70 (2), 115-124

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1652

Abstract: A pseudo-second order rate equation describing the kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat at different initial metal ion concentrations and pear doses has been developed. The kinetics of sorption were followed based on the amounts of metal sorbed at various time intervals. Results show that sorption (chemical bonding) might be rate-limiting in the sorption of divalent metal ions onto peat during agitated batch contact time experiments. The rate constant, the equilibrium sorption capacity and the initial sorption rate were calculated. From these parameters, an empirical model for predicting the sorption capacity of metal ions sorbed was derived. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan, E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Environmental Engineering; Environmental Sciences; Water Resources


Yuh-Shan Ho

何玉山

Gordon McKay

 

12.      Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (2000), The kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat. Water Research, 34 (3), 735-742.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1527

Abstract: A pseudo-second order rate equation describing the kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat at different initial metal ion concentrations and pear doses has been developed. The kinetics of sorption were followed based on the amounts of metal sorbed at various time intervals. Results show that sorption (chemical bonding) might be rate-limiting in the sorption of divalent metal ions onto peat during agitated batch contact time experiments. The rate constant, the equilibrium sorption capacity and the initial sorption rate were calculated. From these parameters, an empirical model for predicting the sorption capacity of metal ions sorbed was derived. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan, E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Environmental Engineering; Environmental Sciences; Water Resources


Xuhua Xia

夏旭华

 

Xie, Z.

 

13.      Xia, X. and Xie, Z. (2001), DAMBE: Software package for data analysis in molecular biology and evolution. Journal of Heredity, 92 (4), 371-373.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1490

Abstract: DAMBE (data analysis in molecular biology and evolution) is an integrated software package for converting, manipulating, statistically and graphically describing, and analyzing molecular sequence data with a user-friendly Windows 95/98/2000/NT interface. DAMBE is free and can be downloaded from http://web.hku.hk/similar to xxia/ software/software.htm. The current version is 4.0.36.

KeyWords Plus: Mitochondrial Genes; Substitutions; Sequences; Rates; DNA

Addresses: University of Hong Kong, Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Biodiversity, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Xuhua Xia: Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Canada. E-mail: xxia@uOttawa.ca

Xie, Z.:

Reprint Address: Xuhua Xia, University of Hong Kong, Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Biodiversity, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Genetics & Heredity


Shuo-Yen Robert Li

Raymond W. Yeung

 

Ning Cai

14.      Li, S.Y.R., Yeung, R.W. and Cai, N. (2003), Linear network coding. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 49 (2), 371-381.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1463

Abstract: Consider a communication network. in which certain source nodes multicast information to other nodes on the network in the multihop fashion where every node can pass on any of its received data to others. We are interested in how fast each node can receive the complete information, or equivalently, what the information rate arriving at each node is. Allowing a node to encode its received data before passing it on, the question involves optimization of the multicast mechanisms at the nodes. Among the simplest coding schemes is linear coding, which regards a block of data as a vector over a certain base field and allows a node to apply a linear transformation to a vector before passing it on. We formulate this multicast problem and prove that linear coding suffices to achieve the optimum, which is the max-flow from the source to each receiving node.

Addresses: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Information Engineering, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Shuo-Yen Robert Li: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Information Engineering, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: bobli@ie.cuhk.edu.hk

Raymond W. Yeung: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Information Engineering, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: whyeung@ie.cuhk.edu.hk

Ning Cai:

Reprint Address: Li, SYR, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Information Engineering, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Web of Science Category: Information Systems Computer Science; Electrical & Electronic Engineering


 

Cheong Yui Wong

Roger Shu-Kwan Cheng

Khaled Ben Letaief

Ross D. Murch

15.      Wong, C.Y., Cheng, R.S., Ben Letaief, K. and Murch, R.D. (1999), Multiuser OFDM with adaptive subcarrier, bit, and power allocation. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 17 (10), 1747-1758.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1445

Abstract: Multiuser orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with adaptive multiuser subcarrier allocation and adaptive modulation is considered. Assuming knowledge of the instantaneous channel gains for all users, we propose a multiuser OFDM subcarrier, bit, and power allocation algorithm to minimize the total transmit power. This is done by assigning each user a set of subcarriers and by determining the number of bits and the transmit power level for each subcarrier. We obtain the performance of our proposed algorithm in a multiuser frequency selective fading environment for various time delay spread values and various numbers of users. The results show that our proposed algorithm outperforms multiuser OFDM systems with static time-division multiple access (TDMA) or frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) techniques which employ fixed and predetermined time-slot or subcarrier allocation schemes. We have also quantified the improvement in terms of the overall required transmit power, the bit-error rate (BER), or the area of coverage for a given outage probability.

Author Keywords: adaptive modulation; frequency selective fading channel; multiaccess communication; multiuser channel; orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM); resource management

KeyWords Plus: MOBILE RADIO

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Present addresses:

Wong, C.Y.:

Cheng, R.S.: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong; E-mail: eecheng@ust.hk

Ben Letaief, K.: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong; E-mail: eekhaled@ust.hk

Murch, R.D.: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong; E-mail: andeermurch@ust.hk

Reprint Address: Wong, CY, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Web of Science Category: Electrical & Electronic Engineering; Telecommunications

Subject Category: Engineering; Telecommunications


Top one citation in 2001 (132 times), 2002 (124 times)

Wenzhi Li

李文治

Sishen Xie

解思深院士

 

Luxi Qian

钱露茜

 

Baohe Chang

常保和

 

B.S. Zou

 

Weiya Zhou

周维亚

Rian Zhao

赵日安

 

Gang Wang

王刚

16.      Li, W.Z., Xie, S.S., Qian, L.X., Chang, B.H., Zou, B.S., Zhou, W.Y., Zhao, R.A. and Wang, G. (1996), Large-scale synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes. Science, 274 (5293), 1701-1703.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1428

Abstract: Large-scale synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes was achieved by using a method based on chemical vapor deposition catalyzed by iron nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica. Scanning electron microscope images show that the nanotubes are approximately perpendicular to the surface of the silica and form an aligned array of isolated tubes with spacings between the tubes of about 100 nanometers. The tubes are up to about 50 micrometers long and well graphitized. The growth direction of the nanotubes may be controlled by the pores from which the nanotubes grow.

KeyWords Plus: FIELD-EMISSION; GROWTH; TUBULES; MICROTUBULES

Addresses: Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China; Cent Univ Nationalities, Dept Phys, Beijing 100081, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Wenzhi Li: Department of Physics, Florida International University, Modesto A. Maidique Campus, 11200 SW 8th Street, CP 204, Miami, FL 33199 USA, E-mail: Wenzhi.Li@fiu.edu

Sishen Xie: Institute of Physics sand Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China; E-mail: ssxie@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

Luxi Qian: Department of Physics, the Central University of Nationalities, Beijing 100087, People’s Republic of China

Chang, BH:

Zou, BS:

Zhou, Weiya: Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P.R. China. E-mail: wyzhou@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

Rian Zhao: Institute of Physics sand Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China

Wang, G.:

Reprint Address: Sishen Xie

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences

Subject Category: Science & Technology - Other Topics


 

Bixia Lin

林碧霞

Zhuxi Fu

傅竹西

 

Yunbo Jia

贾云波

17.      Lin, B.X., Fu, Z.X. and Jia, Y.B. (2001), Green luminescent center in undoped zinc oxide films deposited on silicon substrates. Applied Physics Letters, 79 (7), 943-945.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1419

Abstract: The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the undoped ZnO films deposited on Si substrates by dc reactive sputtering have been studied. There are two emission peaks, centered at 3.18 eV (UV) and 2.38 eV (green). The variation of these peak intensities and that of the I-V properties of the ZnO/Si heterojunctions were investigated at different annealing temperatures and atmospheres. The defect levels in ZnO films were also calculated using the method of full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital. It is concluded that the green emission corresponds to the local level composed by oxide antisite defect O-Zn rather than oxygen vacancy V-O, zinc vacancy V-Zn, interstitial zinc Zn-i, and interstitial oxygen O-i. (C) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

Addresses: Structure Research Laboratory, Academia Sinca, Hefei 230026, Anhui, People’s Republic of China.

Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Bixia Lin: University of Science and Technology of China, Luchow, Anhui Sheng, Republic of China. E-mail: bxlin@ustc.edu.cn

Zhuxi Fu: University of Science and Technology of China, Department of Physics, Hefei, Anhui, Republic of China. Email: fuzx@ustc.edu.cn

Yunbo Jia: University of Science and Technology of China, Luchow, Anhui Sheng, People’s Republic of China.

Reprint Address: Bixia Lin, Structure Research Laboratory, Academia Sinca, Hefei 230026, Anhui, People’s Republic of China.

Web of Science Category: Applied Physics


Jimmy C. Yu

余济美

Jiaguo Yu

余家国

Wingkei Ho

何咏基

 

Zitao Jiang

 

 

Lizhi Zhang

 

18.      Yu, J.C., Yu, J.G., Ho, W.K., Jiang, Z.T. and Zhang, L.Z. (2002), Effects of F- doping on the photocatalytic activity and microstructures of nanocrystalline TiO2 powders. Chemistry of Materials, 14 (9), 3808-3816.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1393

Abstract: A novel and simple method for preparing highly photoactive nanocrystalline F--doped TiO2 photocatalyst with anatase and brookite phase was developed by hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide in a mixed NH4F-H2O solution. The prepared F-doped TiO2 powders were characterized by differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetry (DTA-TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra (PL), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and BET surface areas. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the photocatalytic oxidation of acetone in air. The results showed that the crystallinity of anatase was improved upon F- doping. Moreover, fluoride ions not only suppressed the formation of brookite phase but also prevented phase transition of anatase to rutile. The F-doped TiO2 samples exhibited stronger absorption in the UV-visible range with a red shift in the band gap transition. The photocatalytic activity of F-doped TiO2 powders prepared by this method exceeded that of Degussa P25 when the molar ratio of NH4F to H2O was kept in the range of 0.5-3.

Addresses: Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Chem, Sha Tin, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Mat Sci & Technol Res Ctr, Sha Tin, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Wuhan Univ Technol, State Key Lab Adv Technol Mat Synth & Proc, Wuhan 430070, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Jimmy C. Yu: Department of Chemistry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: jimyu@cuhk.edu.hk

Jiaguo Yu: State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing,Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com

Wingkei Ho: Department of Science and Environmental Studies, Hong Kong Institute of Education, 10 Lo Ping Road, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: keithho@ied.edu.hk

Zitao Jiang:

Lizhi Zhang:

Reprint Address: Yu, JC, Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Chem, Sha Tin, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


Qing Wan

万青

Qiuhong Li

李秋红

Yujin Chen

陈玉金

Taihong Wang

王太宏

 

Xiu-Li He

何秀丽

 

Jian-Ping Li

李建平

 

Chenglu Lin

林成鲁

 

19.      Wan, Q., Li, Q.H., Chen, Y.J., Wang, T.H., He, X.L., Li, J.P. and Lin, C.L. (2004), Fabrication and ethanol sensing characteristics of ZnO nanowire gas sensors. Applied Physics Letters, 84 (18), 3654-3656.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1334

Abstract: Based on the achievement of synthesis of ZnO nanowires in mass production, ZnO nanowires gas sensors were fabricated with microelectromechanical system technology and ethanol-sensing characteristics were investigated. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity and fast response to ethanol gas at a work temperature of 300 degreesC. Our results demonstrate the potential application of ZnO nanowires for fabricating highly sensitive gas sensors. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

Addresses:

Qing Wan: Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Qiuhong Li: Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Yujin Chen: Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Taihong Wang: Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

X.L. He: State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China

J.P. Li: State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China

C. L. Lin: Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Qing Wan: E-mail: wanqing7686@hotmail.com; wanqing76@hnu.cn

Qiuhong Li: E-mail: liqiuhong@xmu.edu.cn

Yujin Chen: E-mail: chenyujin@hrbeu.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Taihong Wang, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: thwang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Applied Physics

Research Areas: Physics


Top one citation in 2003 (157 times), 2004 (274 times), 2005 (241 times), 2006 (135 times)

Joseph Sriyal Malik Peiris

 

 

S.T. Lai

 

Leo L.M. Poon

潘烈文

 

Y. Guan

 

 

Loretta Yam

 

 

Wilina Lim

 

 

John M. Nicholls

 

 

W.K.S. Yee

 

 

W.W. Yan

 

 

M.T. Cheung

 

Vincent C.C. Cheng

 

 

K.H. Chan

 

 

Dominic N.C. Tsang

 

 

Raymond W.H. Yung

 

 

Tak Keung Ng

 

 

K.Y. Yuen

 

20.      Peiris, J.S.M., Lai, S.T., Poon, L.L.M., Guan, Y., Yam, L.Y.C., Lim, W., Nicholls, J., Yee, W.K.S., Yan, W.W., Cheung, M.T., Cheng, V.C.C., Chan, K.H., Tsang, D.N.C., Yung, R.W.H., Ng, T.K., Yuen, K.Y. and SARS Study Group (2003), Coronavirus as a possible cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome. Lancet, 361 (9366), 1319-1325.

ESI

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1326

Abstract: Background An outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been reported in Hong Kong. We investigated the viral cause and clinical presentation among 50 patients. Methods We analysed case notes and microbiological findings for 50 patients with SARS, representing more than five separate epidemiologically linked transmission clusters. We defined the clinical presentation and risk factors associated with severe disease and investigated the causal agents by chest radiography and laboratory testing of nasopharyngeal aspirates and sera samples. We compared the laboratory findings with those submitted for microbiological investigation of other diseases from patients whose identity was masked. Findings Patients, age ranged from 23 to 74 years. Fever, chills, myalgia, and cough were the most frequent complaints. When compared with chest radiographic changes, respiratory symptoms and auscultatory findings were disproportionally mild. Patients who were household contacts of other infected people and had older age, lymphopenia, and liver dysfunction were associated with severe disease. A virus belonging to the family Coronaviridae was isolated from two patients. By use of serological and reverse-transcriptase PCR specific for this virus, 45 of 50 patients with SARS, but no controls, had evidence of infection with this virus. Interpretation A coronavirus was isolated from patients with SARS that might be the primary agent associated with this disease. Serological and molecular tests specific for the virus permitted a definitive laboratory diagnosis to be made and allowed further investigation to define whether other cofactors play a part in disease progression.

KeyWords Plus: HUMAN-DISEASE; VIRUS; INFECTIONS; DIAGNOSIS

Addresses:

Univ Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hosp, Dept Pathol & Microbiol, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; Princess Margaret Hosp, Dept Med Intens Care & Pathol, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; Dept Hlth, Govt Virus Unit, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hosp, Dept Pathol & Med, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; Kwong Wah Hosp, Dept Med, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; Queen Elizabeth Hosp, Dept Pathol, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Reprint Address: Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik, Univ Hong Kong, School of Public Health, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: malik@hku.hk

Web of Science Category: Medicine, General & Internal

Subject Category: General & Internal Medicine


 

Tian Lu

卢天

Feiwu Chen

陈飞武

21.      Lu, T. and Chen, F.W. (2012), Multiwfn: A multifunctional wavefunction analyzer. Journal of Computational Chemistry, 33 (5), 580-592.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1324

Abstract: Multiwfn is a multifunctional program for wavefunction analysis. Its main functions are: (1) Calculating and visualizing real space function, such as electrostatic potential and electron localization function at point, in a line, in a plane or in a spatial scope. (2) Population analysis. (3) Bond order analysis. (4) Orbital composition analysis. (5) Plot density-of-states and spectrum. (6) Topology analysis for electron density. Some other useful utilities involved in quantum chemistry studies are also provided. The built-in graph module enables the results of wavefunction analysis to be plotted directly or exported to high-quality graphic file. The program interface is very user-friendly and suitable for both research and teaching purpose. The code of Multiwfn is substantially optimized and parallelized. Its efficiency is demonstrated to be significantly higher than related programs with the same functions. Five practical examples involving a wide variety of systems and analysis methods are given to illustrate the usefulness of Multiwfn. The program is free of charge and open-source. Its precompiled file and source codes are available from.

Addresses:

Department of chemistry and chemical engineer, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Tian Lu: Beijing Kein Research Center for Natural Sciences, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: sobereva@sina.com

Feiwu Chen: University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: sobereva@sina.com

Reprint Address: Tian Lu, Department of chemistry and chemical engineer, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: sobereva@sina.com

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Zhicai He

何志才

Chengmei Zhong

仲成美

 

Xun Huang

 

 

Wai-Yeung Wong

 

Hongbin Wu

吴宏滨

 

Liwei Chen

 

Shijian Su

苏仕健

Yong Cao

曹镛院士

22.      He, Z.C., Zhong, C.M., Huang, X., Wong, W.Y., Wu, H.B., Chen, L.W., Su, S.J. and Cao, Y. (2011), Simultaneous enhancement of open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and fill factor in polymer solar cells. Advanced Materials, 23 (40), 4636-1043.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1285

Abstract: Simultaneous enhancement of open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and fill factor in highly efficient polymer solar cells by incorporating an alcohol/water-soluble conjugated polymer as cathode interlayer is domonstrated. When combined with a low-bandgap polymer PTB7 as the electron donor material, the power efficiency of the devices is improved to a certified 8.370%. Due to the drastic improvement in efficiency and easy utilization, this method opens new opportunities for PSCs from various material systems to improve towards 10% efficiency.

Addresses:

[He, Zhicai; Zhong, Chengmei; Wu, Hongbin; Su, Shijian; Cao, Yong] S China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Luminescent Mat & Devices, Inst Polymer Optoelect Mat & Devices, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China

[Huang, Xun; Chen, Liwei] Chinese Acad Sci, Suzhou Inst Nanotech & Nanobion, Suzhou 215123, People’s Republic of China

[Wong, Wai-Yeung] Univ Grants Comm, Areas Excellence Scheme, Inst Mol Funct Mat, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

[Wong, Wai-Yeung] Hong Kong Baptist Univ, Dept Chem, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

[Wong, Wai-Yeung] Hong Kong Baptist Univ, Ctr Adv Luminescence Mat, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Zhicai He:

Chengmei Zhong:

Xun Huang:

Wai-Yeung Wong:

Hongbin Wu:

Liwei Chen:

Shijian Su:

Yong Cao:

Reprint Address: Reprint Address: Wu, HB (reprint author), S China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Luminescent Mat & Devices, Inst Polymer Optoelect Mat & Devices, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China E-mail Addresses: hbwu@scut.edu.cn; lwchen2008@sinano.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Chemistry, Physical; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Physics, Applied; Physics, Condensed Matter


Xi Chen

 

Yi Ba

 

 

Lijia Ma

 

 

Xing Cai

蔡星

 

Yuan Yin

殷媛

 

Kehui Wang

王可慧

 

Jigang Guo

郭继刚

 

Yujing Zhang

 

Jiangning Chen

陈江宁

 

Xing Guo

 

 

Qibin Li

 

 

Xiaoying Li

 

 

Wenjing Wang

 

 

Yan Zhang

 

 

Jin Wang

 

 

Xueyuan Jiang

 

 

Yang Xiang

 

 

Chen Xu

 

 

Pingping Zheng

 

 

Juanbin Zhang

 

 

Ruiqiang Li

 

 

Hongjie Zhang

 

 

Xiaobin Shang

 

 

Ting Gong

 

Guang Ning

宁光

 

Jun Wang

 

 

Ke Zen

曾科

Junfeng Zhang

张峻峰

Chen-Yu Zhang

张辰宇

 

 

23.      Chen, X., Ba, Y., Ma, L.J., Cai, X., Yin, Y., Wang, K.H., Guo, J.G., Zhang, Y.J., Zhang, Chen, J.N., Guo, X., Li, Q.B., Li, X.Y., Wang, W.J., Zhang, Y., Wang, J., Jiang, X.Y., Xiang, Y., Xu, C., Zheng, P.P., Zhang, J.B., Li, R.Q., Zhang, H.J., Shang, X.B., Gong, T., Ning, G., Wang, J., Zen, K., Zhang, J.F., and Zhang, C.Y. (2008), Characterization of microRNAs in serum: A novel class of biomarkers for diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. Cell Research, 18 (10), 997-1006.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1297

Abstract: Dysregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in various tissues has been associated with a variety of diseases, including cancers. Here we demonstrate that miRNAs are present in the serum and plasma of humans and other animals such as mice, rats, bovine fetuses, calves, and horses. The levels of miRNAs in serum are stable, reproducible, and consistent among individuals of the same species. Employing Solexa, we sequenced all serum miRNAs of healthy Chinese subjects and found over 100 and 91 serum miRNAs in male and female subjects, respectively. We also identified specific expression patterns of serum miRNAs for lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and diabetes, providing evidence that serum miRNAs contain fingerprints for various diseases. Two non-small cell lung cancer-specific serum miRNAs obtained by Solexa were further validated in an independent trial of 75 healthy donors and 152 cancer patients, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Through these analyses, we conclude that serum miRNAs can serve as potential biomarkers for the detection of various cancers and other diseases.

Addresses: [Chen, Xi; Cai, Xing; Yin, Yuan; Wang, Kehui; Guo, Jigang; Zhang, Yujing; Chen, Jiangning; Guo, Xing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jin; Jiang, Xueyuan; Xiang, Yang; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Hongjie; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Chen-Yu] Nanjing Univ, Sch Life Sci, State Key Lab Pharmaceut Biotechnol, Jiangsu Diabet Ctr, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China.

 [Ba, Yi; Shang, Xiaobin; Gong, Ting] Tianjin Med Univ Canc Inst & Hosp, Tianjin 300000, People’s Republic of China.

 [Ma, Lijia; Li, Qibin; Zheng, Pingping; Zhang, Juanbin; Li, Ruiqiang; Wang, Jun] Beijing Genom Inst, Shenzhen 518083, People’s Republic of China.

 [Ma, Lijia; Li, Qibin; Wang, Jun] Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing Inst Genom, Beijing 101300, People’s Republic of China.

 [Li, Xiaoying; Ning, Guang] Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Med, Ruijin Hosp, Dept Endocrine & Metab Dis, Shanghai 200025, People’s Republic of China.

 [Wang, Wenjing] Shanghai Municipal Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Shanghai 200336, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Xi Chen: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: sunnycissy@163.com

Yi Ba: Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300000, People’s Republic of China

Lijia Ma:

Xing Cai: E-mail: grace851204@163.com

Yuan Yin: E-mail: yinyuandiana@yahoo.com.cn

Kehui Wang: E-mail: ake1999@163.com

Jigang Guo: E-mail: gjig2008@163.com

Yujing Zhang:

Jiangning Chen: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: jnchen@nju.edu.cn

Xing Guo:

Qibin Li: Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzhen 518083, People’s Republic of China; Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 101300, People’s Republic of China

Xiaoying Li: Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to The Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, People’s Republic of China

Wenjing Wang: Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai 200336, People’s Republic of China

Yan Zhang: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China

Jin Wang: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China

Xueyuan Jiang: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China

Yang Xiang: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China

Chen Xu: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China

Pingping Zheng:

Juanbin Zhang:

Ruiqiang Li:

Hongjie Zhang:

Xiaobin Shang:

Ting Gong:

Guang Ning: Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to The Shanghai Jiao Tong University

School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: guangning@medmail.com.cn

Jun Wang: Soochow University (PRC), Institutes of Biology & Medical Sciences, People’s Republic of China

Ke Zen: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: kzen@nju.edu.cn

Junfeng Zhang: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: jfzhang@nju.edu.cn

Chen-Yu Zhang: Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, People’s Republic of China.

Reprint Address: Zhang, CY (reprint author), Nanjing Univ, Sch Life Sci, State Key Lab Pharmaceut Biotechnol, Jiangsu Diabet Ctr, 22 Hankou Rd, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: cyzhang@nju.edu.cn

E-mail Addresses: wangj@genomics.org.cn; kzen@nju.edu.cn; jfzhang@nju.edu.cn; cyzhang@nju.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Cell Biology


Dacheng Wei

魏大程

 

Yunqi Liu

 

 

Yu Wang

 

 

Hongliang Zhang

 

 

Liping Huang

 

 

Gui Yu

 

24.      Wei, D.C., Liu, Y.Q., Wang, Y., Zhang, H.L., Huang, L.P. and Yu, G. (2009), Synthesis of N-doped graphene by chemical vapor deposition and its electrical properties. Nano Letters, 9 (5), 1752-1758.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1247

Abstract: To realize graphene-based electronics, various types of graphene are required; thus, modulation of its electrical properties is of great importance. Theoretic studies show that intentional doping is a promising route for this goal, and the doped graphene might promise fascinating properties and widespread applications. However, there is no experimental example and electrical testing of the substitutionally doped graphene up to date. Here, we synthesize the N-doped graphene by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. We find that most of them are few-layer graphene, although single-layer graphene can be occasionally detected. As doping accompanies with the recombination of carbon atoms into graphene in the CVD process, N atoms can be substitutionally doped into the graphene lattice, which is hard to realize by other synthetic methods. Electrical measurements show that the N-doped graphene exhibits an n-type behavior, indicating substitutional doping can effectively modulate the electrical properties of graphene. Our finding provides a new experimental instance of graphene and would promote the research and applications of graphene.

Addresses:

Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, People’s Republic of China

Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Dacheng Wei: Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: weidc@fudan.edu.cn

Yunqi Liu: Albemarle, Fine Chem, Baton Rouge, USA

Yu Wang: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics. Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Hongliang Zhang: Central South University, School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Changsha, People’s Republic of China

Liping Huang: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Gui Yu: Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Reprint Address: Liu, Yunqi (reprint author), Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, People’s Republic of China.

E-mail Addresses: liuyq@iccas.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Multidisciplinary Materials Science; Applied Physics; Condensed Matter Physics


 

Zhong-Shuai Wu

吴忠帅

Wencai Ren

任文才

 

Lei Wen

闻雷

Libo Gao

高力波

 

Jinping Zhao

赵金平

 

Zongping Chen

陈宗平

 

Guangmin Zhou

周光敏

Feng Li

Hui-Ming Cheng

成会明

 

25.      Wu, Z.S., Ren, W.C., Wen, L., Gao, L.B., Zhao, J.P., Chen, Z.P., Zhou, G.M., Li, F. and Cheng, H.M. (2010), Graphene anchored with Co3O4 nanoparticles as anode of lithium ion batteries with enhanced reversible capacity and cyclic performance. ACS NANO, 4 (6), 3187-3194.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1240

Abstract: We report a facile strategy to synthesize the nanocomposite of Co3O4 nanoparticles anchored on conducting graphene as an advanced anode material for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The Co3O4 nanoparticles obtained are 10-30 nm in size and homogeneously anchor on graphene sheets as spacers to keep the neighboring sheets separated. This Co3O4/graphene nanocomposite displays superior Li-battery performance with large reversible capacity, excellent cyclic performance, and good rate capability, highlighting the importance of the anchoring of nanopartides on graphene sheets for maximum utilization of electrochemically active Co3O4 nanopartides and graphene for energy storage applications in high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

Addresses: Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Met Res, Shenyang Natl Lab Mat Sci, 72 Wenhua Rd, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Zhong-Shuai Wu: Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany

Wencai Ren: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: wcren@imr.ac.cn

Lei Wen: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Libo Gao: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: lbgao@nju.edu.cn

Jinping Zhao: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Zongping Chen: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Guangmin Zhou: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Feng Li: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of metal research, Beijing, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: fli@imr.ac.cn

Hui-Ming Cheng: Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: cheng@imr.ac.cn

Reprint Address: Wencai Ren, Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Met Res, Shenyang Natl Lab Mat Sci, 72 Wenhua Rd, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China.

E-mail Addresses: wcren@imr.ac.cn; cheng@imr.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


 

Zongping Chen

陈宗平

Wencai Ren

任文才

Libo Gao

高力波

 

Bilu Liu

刘碧录

Songfeng Pei

裴嵩峰

Hui-Ming Cheng

成会明

26.      Chen, Z.P., Ren, W.C., Gao, L.B., Liu, B.L., Pei, S.F. and Cheng, H.M. (2011), Three-dimensional flexible and conductive interconnected graphene networks grown by chemical vapour deposition. Nature Materials, 10 (6), 424-428.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1233

Abstract: Integration of individual two-dimensional graphene sheets(1-3) into macroscopic structures is essential for the application of graphene. A series of graphene-based composites(4-6) and macroscopic structures(7-11) have been recently fabricated using chemically derived graphene sheets. However, these composites and structures suffer from poor electrical conductivity because of the low quality and/or high inter-sheet junction contact resistance of the chemically derived graphene sheets. Here we report the direct synthesis of three-dimensional foam-like graphene macrostructures, which we call graphene foams (GFs), by template-directed chemical vapour deposition. A GF consists of an interconnected flexible network of graphene as the fast transport channel of charge carriers for high electrical conductivity. Even with a GF loading as low as similar to 0.5 wt%, GF/poly(dimethyl siloxane) composites show a very high electrical conductivity of similar to 10 S cm(-1), which is similar to 6 orders of magnitude higher than chemically derived graphene-based composites(4). Using this unique network structure and the outstanding electrical and mechanical properties of GFs, as an example, we demonstrate the great potential of GF/poly(dimethyl siloxane) composites for flexible, foldable and stretchable conductors(12).

Addresses:

Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China

Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Zongping Chen: Guangxi University, Nanning, People’s Republic of China.

Wencai Ren: Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, People’s Republic of China, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: wcren@imr.ac.cn

Libo Gao: School of Physics, Nanjing University, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: lbgao@nju.edu.cn

Bilu Liu: Aalto University, Helsinki, Uusimaa, Finland

Songfeng Pei: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Advanced Carbon Division, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Hui-Ming Cheng: Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: cheng@imr.ac.cn

Reprint Address: Hui-Ming Cheng (reprint author), Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China.

E-mail Addresses: cheng@imr.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry, Multidisciplinary Materials Science, Applied Physics, Physics, Condensed Matter


 

Zhengyou Liu

 

 

Xixiang Zhang

 

 

Yiwei Mao

 

 

Y.Y. Zhu

 

Zhiyu Yang

 

Che Ting Chan

 

Ping Sheng

 

 

27.      Liu, Z.Y., Zhang, X.X., Mao, Y.W., Zhu, Y.Y., Yang, Z.Y., Chan, C.T. and Sheng, P. (2000), Locally resonant sonic materials. Science, 289 (5485), 1734-1736.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1230

Abstract: We have fabricated sonic crystals, based on the idea of Localized resonant structures, that exhibit spectral gaps with a Lattice constant two orders of magnitude smaller than the relevant wavelength. Disordered composites made from such localized resonant structures behave as a material with effective negative elastic constants and a total wave reflector within certain tunable sonic frequency ranges. A 2-centimeter slab of this composite material is shown to break the conventional mass-density Law of sound transmission by one or more orders of magnitude at 400 hertz.

Addresses:

Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Zhengyou Liu:

Xixiang Zhang:

Yiwei Mao:

Y.Y. Zhu:

Zhiyu Yang: Ping Sheng: Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: phyang@ust.hk

Che Ting Chan: Ping Sheng: Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: phchan@ust.hk

Ping Sheng: Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: sheng@ust.hk

Reprint Address: Ping Sheng, Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: phsheng@ust.hk

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


 

Caicun Zhou

 

Yi-Long Wu

 

 

Gongyan Chen

 

 

Jifeng Feng

 

 

Xiao-Qing Liu

 

 

Changli Wang

 

 

Shucai Zhang

 

Jie Wang

 

 

Songwen Zhou

 

 

Shengxiang Ren

 

 

Shun Lu

 

 

Li Zhang

 

 

Chengping Hu

 

 

Chunhong Hu

 

 

Yi Luo

 

 

Lei Chen

 

 

Ming Ye

 

 

Jianan Huang

 

 

Xiuyi Zhi

 

 

Yiping Zhang

 

 

Qingyu Xiu

 

 

Jun Ma

 

 

Li Zhang

 

 

Changxuan You

 

28.      Zhou, C.C., Wu, Y.L., Chen, G.Y., Feng, J.F., Liu, X.Q., Wang, C.L., Zhang, S.C., Wang, J., Zhou, S.W., Ren, S.X., Lu, S., Zhang, L., Hu, C.P., Hu, C.H., Luo, Y., Chen, L., Ye, M., Huang, J.N., Zhi, X.Y., Zhang, Y.P., Xiu, Q.Y., Ma, J., Zhang, L. and You, C.X. (2011), Erlotinib versus chemotherapy as first-line treatment for patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (OPTIMAL, CTONG-0802): A multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 study. Lancet Oncology, 12 (8), 735-742.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1220

Abstract: Background Activating mutations in EGFR are important markers of response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The OPTIMAL study compared efficacy and tolerability of the TKI erlotinib versus standard chemotherapy in the first-line treatment of patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC. Methods We undertook an open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial at 22 centres in China. Patients older than 18 years with histologically confirmed stage IIIB or IV NSCLC and a confirmed activating mutation of EGFR (exon 19 deletion or exon 21 L858R point mutation) received either oral erlotinib (150 mg/day) until disease progression or unacceptable toxic effects, or up to four cycles of gemcitabine plus carboplatin. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) with a minimisation procedure and were stratified according to EGFR mutation type, histological subtype (adenocarcinoma vs non-adenocarcinoma), and smoking status. The primary outcome was progression-free survival, analysed in patients with confirmed disease who received at least one dose of study treatment. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00874419, and has completed enrolment; patients are still in follow-up. Findings 83 patients were randomly assigned to receive erlotinib and 82 to receive gemcitabine plus carboplatin; 82 in the erlotinib group and 72 in the chemotherapy group were included in analysis of the primary endpoint. Median progression-free survival was significantly longer in erlotinib-treated patients than in those on chemotherapy (13.1 [95% CI 10.58-16.53] vs 4.6 [4.21-5.42] months; hazard ratio 0.16, 95% CI 0.10-0.26; p<0.0001). Chemotherapy was associated with more grade 3 or 4 toxic effects than was erlotinib (including neutropenia in 30 [42%] of 72 patients and thrombocytopenia in 29 [40%] patients on chemotherapy vs no patients with either event on erlotinib); the most common grade 3 or 4 toxic effects with erlotinib were increased alanine aminotransferase concentrations (three [4%] of 83 patients) and skin rash (two [2%] patients). Chemotherapy was also associated with increased treatment-related serious adverse events (ten [14%] of 72 patients [decreased platelet count, n=8; decreased neutrophil count, n=1; hepatic dysfunction, n=1] vs two [2%] of 83 patients [both hepatic dysfunction]). Interpretation Compared with standard chemotherapy, erlotinib conferred a significant progression-free survival benefit in patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC and was associated with more favourable tolerability. These findings suggest that erlotinib is important for first-line treatment of patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC.

Addresses:

Department of Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China.

Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China.

Cancer Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China.

Jiangsu Province Cancer Hospital, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China.

307 Hospital of the Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Cancer Center, Department of Pulmonary Oncology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Tianjin Cancer Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China.

Beijing Chest Hospital and Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Shanghai Chest Hospital and Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China.

Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China.

Xiangya Hospital and Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China; Hunan Province Cancer Hospital, Changsha, People’s Republic of China.

Cancer Hospital Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, People’s Republic of China.

First Affi liated Hospital of Suzhou University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China.

Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China.

Changzhen Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China.

Harbin Institute of Hematology and Oncology, Harbin, People’s Republic of China.

Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Caicun Zhou:

Yi-Long Wu:

Gongyan Chen: Harbin Medical University, Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin, People’s Republic of China.

Jifeng Feng:

Xiao-Qing Liu: Academy of Military Medical Sciences, T’ien-ching-shih, Tianjin Shi, People’s Republic of China.

Changli Wang:

Shucai Zhang: Beijing Hospital, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Jie Wang: Stanford University, Center for Sustainable Develpment and Global Competitiveness Stanford, CA, USA

Songwen Zhou: Shanghai University, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, People’s Republic of China.

Shengxiang Ren: Tongji University, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, People’s Republic of China.

Shun Lu:

Li Zhang:

Chengping Hu:

Chunhong Hu: The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Ch’ang-sha-shih, Hunan, People’s Republic of China.

Yi Luo:

Lei Chen: Shantou University, Swatow, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China.

Ming Ye: Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, People’s Republic of China.

Jianan Huang: Suzhou University, Suchow, Anhui Sheng, People’s Republic of China.

Xiuyi Zhi: Xuanwu hospital, Peping, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Yiping Zhang: Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Medical Oncology Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China.

Qingyu Xiu:

Jun Ma: Soochow University (PRC), Wu-hsien, Jiangsu Sheng, People’s Republic of China.

Li Zhang:

Changxuan You: Sichuan University, Hua-yang, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China.

Reprint Address: Caicun Zhou, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: caicunzhou@yahoo.com.cn

Web of Science Category: Oncology


Weiqiang Han

韩伟强

Shoushan Fan

范守善院士

Qunqing Li

李群庆

 

Yongdan Hu

 

29.      Han, W.Q., Fan, S.S., Li, Q.Q. and Hu, Y.D. (1997), Synthesis of gallium nitride nanorods through a carbon nanotube-confined reaction. Science, 277 (5330), 1287-1289.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1210

Abstract: Gallium nitride nanorods were prepared through a carbon nanotube-confined reaction. Ga2O vapor was reacted with NH3 gas in the presence of carbon nanotubes to form wurtzite gallium nitride nanorods. The nanorods have a diameter of 4 to 50 nanometers and a length of up to 25 micrometers. It is proposed that the carbon nanotube acts as a template to confine the reaction, which results in the gallium nitride nanorods having a diameter similar to that of the original nanotubes. The results suggest that it might be possible to synthesize other nitride nanorods through similar carbon nanotube-confined reactions.

Addresses: Tsing Hua Univ, Dept Phys, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China; Tsing Hua Univ, Ctr Atom & Mol Sci, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Weiqiang Han: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Bldg 735, Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA. E-mail: whan@bnl.gov

Shoushan Fan: Tsinghua University, Department of Physics, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China; E-mail: fss-dmp@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Qunqing Li: Tsinghua University, Department of Physics, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China; E-mail: qunqli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Yongdan Hu:

Reprint Address: Shoushan Fan

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences

Subject Category: Science & Technology - Other Topics


Xiaoming Sun

孙晓明

Yadong Li

李亚栋院士

30.      Sun, X.M. and Li, Y.D. (2004), Colloidal carbon spheres and their core/shell structures with noble-metal nanoparticles. Angewandte Chemie-International Edition, 43 (5), 597-601.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1208

KeyWords Plus: Enhanced Raman-Scattering; Core-Shell Particles; In-Situ Formation; Polystyrene Microspheres; Deposition; Spherules; Surfaces; Acid

Addresses:

Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, People’s Republic of China

The Key Laboratory of Atomic & Molecular Nanosciences (Ministry of Education), People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Xiaoming Sun: Beijing University of Chemical Technology, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: sunxm@mail.buct.edu.cn

Yadong Li: Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: ydli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Yadong Li, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: ydli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Yan Wang

 

 

Zhiqiang Shi

 

 

Yi Huang

 

 

Yanfeng Ma

 

 

Chengyang Wang

 

 

Mingming Chen

 

Yongsheng Chen

 

 

31.      Wang, Y., Shi, Z.Q., Huang, Y., Ma, Y.F., Wang, C.Y., Chen, M.M. and Chen, Y.S. (2009), Supercapacitor devices based on graphene materials. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 113 (30), 13103-13107.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1159

Abstract: Graphene materials (GMs) as supercapacitor electrode materials have been investigated. GMs are prepared from graphene oxide sheets, and subsequently suffer a gas-based hydrazine reduction to restore the conducting carbon network. A maximum specific capacitance of 205 F/g with a measured power density of 10 kW/kg at energy density of 28.5 Wh/kg in an aqueous electrolyte solution has been obtained. Meanwhile, the supercapacitor devices exhibit excellent long cycle life along with similar to 90% specific capacitance retained after 1200 cycle tests. These remarkable results demonstrate the exciting commercial potential for high performance, environmentally friendly and low-cost electrical energy storage devices based on this new 2D graphene material.

Addresses:

Nankai University, Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials, Tianjin 300071, People’s Republic of China

Nankai University, College of Chemistry, Institute of Polymer Chemistry, Center for Nanoscale Science & Technology, Tianjin 300071, People’s Republic of China

Tianjin University, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of State Education Ministry, Tianjin 300072, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Yan Wang: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Zhiqiang Shi: Tianjin Polytechnic University, T’ien-ching-shih, Tianjin Shi, People’s Republic of China.

Yi Huang: Nankai University, T’ien-ching-shih, Tianjin Shi, People’s Republic of China.

Yanfeng Ma: Nankai University, Department of Chemistry, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China.

Chengyang Wang: Technische Universität München, Catalysis Research Center, Munich, Bayern, Germany

Mingming Chen: Tianjin University, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China.

Yongsheng Chen: Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. E-mail: yongsheng.chen@ce.gatech.edu

Reprint Address: Yongsheng Chen, Nankai University, Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials, Tianjin 300071, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: yschen99@nankai.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry, Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, Multidisciplinary Materials Science


Zhi-An Ren

任治安

 

Wei Lu

陆伟

Jie Yang

杨杰

 

Wei Yi

衣玮

 

Xiao-Li Shen

慎晓丽

 

Zheng-Cai Li

李正才

 

Guang-Can Che

车广灿

 

Xiao-Li Dong

董晓莉

 

Li-Ling Sun

孙丽玲

 

Fang Zhou

周放

Zhong-Xian Zhao

赵忠贤院士

2015 Bernd T. Matthias Prize

 

32.      Ren, Z.A., Lu, W., Yang, J., Yi, W., Shen, X.L., Li, Z.C., Che, G.C., Dong, X.L., Sun, L.L., Zhou, F. and Zhao, Z.X. (2008), Superconductivity at 55K in iron-based F-doped layered quaternary compound Sm[O1-xFx]FeAs. Chinese Physics Letters, 25 (6), 2215-2216.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1155

Abstract: We report the superconductivity in iron-based oxyarsenide Sm[O(1-x)F(x)]FeAs, with the onset resistivity transition temperature at 55.0K and Meissner transition at 54.6 K. This compound has the same crystal structure as LaOFeAs with shrunk crystal lattices, and becomes the superconductor with the highest critical temperature among all materials besides copper oxides up to now.

Addresses:

Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Natl Lab Superconduct, Beijing 100190, People’s Republic of China.

Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing Natl Lab Condensed Matter Phys, Beijing 100190, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Zhi-An Ren: Institute of Physics, University of Chinese Academy Science. E-mail: renzhian@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

Wei Lu:

Jie Yang: University of Chinese Academy Science.

Xiao-Li Shen: University of Chinese Academy Science.

Zheng-Cai Li: University of Chinese Academy Science.

Guang-Can Che: Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology.

Xiao-Li Dong: Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology.

Li-Ling Sun: Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology.

Fang Zhou: Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Zhong-Xian Zhao: Chinese Academy of Sciences. E-mail: zhxzhao@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

Reprint Address: Ren, ZA (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Natl Lab Superconduct, POB 603, Beijing 100190, People’s Republic of China.

E-mail Addresses: renzhian@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Physics


Yuxi Xu

徐宇曦

 

Kaixuan Sheng

盛凯旋

 

Chun Li

李春

Gaoquan Shi

石高全

33.      Xu, Y.X., Sheng, K.X., Li, C. and Shi, G.Q. (2010), Self-assembled graphene hydrogel via a one-step hydrothermal process. ACS NANO, 4 (7), 4324-4330.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1152

Abstract: Self-assembly of two-dimensional graphene sheets is an important strategy for producing macroscopic graphene architectures for practical applications, such as thin films and layered paperlike materials. However, construction of graphene self-assembled macrostructures with three-dimensional networks has never been realized. In this paper, we prepared a self-assembled graphene hydrogel (SGH) via a convenient one-step hydrothermal method. The SGH is electrically conductive, mechanically strong, and thermally stable and exhibits a high specific capacitance. The high-performance SGH with inherent biocompatibility of carbon materials is attractive in the fields of biotechnology and electrochemistry, such as drug-delivery, tissue scaffolds, bionic nanocomposites, and supercapacitors.

Addresses:

Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Yuxi Xu: Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: xuyuxi@fudan.edu.cn

Kaixuan Sheng:

Chun Li: Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: chunli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Gaoquan Shi: Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: gshi@tsinghua.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Gaoquan Shi, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: gshi@tsinghua.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


Lei Lu

卢磊

Yongfeng Shen

畅永锋

 

Xianhua Chen

 

Lihua Qian

钱立华

Ke Lu

卢柯 院士

34.      Lu, L., Shen, Y.F., Chen, X.H., Qian, L.H. and Lu, K. (2004), Ultrahigh strength and high electrical conductivity in copper. Science, 304 (5669), 422-426.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1151

Abstract: Methods used to strengthen metals generally also cause a pronounced decrease in electrical conductivity, so that a tradeoff must be made between conductivity and mechanical strength. We synthesized pure copper samples with a high density of nanoscale growth twins. They showed a tensile strength about 10 times higher than that of conventional coarse-grained copper, while retaining an electrical conductivity comparable to that of pure copper. The ultrahigh strength originates from the effective blockage of dislocation motion by numerous coherent twin boundaries that possess an extremely low electrical resistivity, which is not the case for other types of grain boundaries.

Addresses:

Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science (SYNL), Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Lei Lu: Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science (SYNL), Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: llu@imr.ac.cn

Yongfeng Shen: Northeastern University (Shenyang, China), Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, People’s Republic of China.

Xianhua Chen:

Lihua Qian: Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Physics, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: lhqian@mail.hust.edu.cn

Ke Lu: Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science (SYNL), Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: lu@imr.ac.cn

Reprint Address: K. Lu, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science (SYNL), Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China.

E-mail Addresses: lu@imr.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Sciences


Hao Zhang

张昊

 

Xiaojun Lv

吕小军

Yueming Li

李悦明

 

Ying Wang

 

Jinghong Li

李景虹

35.      Zhang, H., Lv, X.J., Li, Y.M., Wang, Y. and Li, J.H. (2010), P25-graphene composite as a high performance photocatalyst. ACS NANO, 4 (1), 380-386.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1137

Abstract: Abstract: Herein we obtained a chemically bonded TiO(2) (P25)-graphene nanocomposite photocatalyst with graphene oxide and P25, using a facile one-step hydrothermal method. During the hydrothermal reaction, both of the reduction of graphene oxide and loading of P25 were achieved. The as-prepared P25-graphene photocatalyst possessed great adsorptivity of dyes, extended light absorption range, and efficient charge separation properties simultaneously, which was rarely reported in other TiO(2)-carbon photocatalysts. Hence, in the photodegradation of methylene blue, a significant enhancement in the reaction rate was observed with P25-graphene, compared to the bare P25 and P25-CNTs with the same carbon content. Overall, this work could provide new insights into the fabrication of a TiO(2)-carbon composite as high performance photocatalysts and facilitate their application in the environmental protection issues.

Addresses:

Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Hao Zhang:

Xiaojun Lv:

Yueming Li: Yan Shan University, College of Materials Science and Engineering, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: liyueming@ysu.edu.cn

Ying Wang:

Jinghong Li:

Reprint Address: Jinghong Li, Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China.

E-mail Addresses: hli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


Siyun Shu

舒斯云

Gong Ju

鞠躬院士

 

Lingzhi Fan

 

36.      Shu, S.Y., Ju, G. and Fan, L.Z. (1988), The glucose-oxidase dab nickel method in peroxidase histochemistry of the nervous-system. Neuroscience Letters, 85 (2), 169-171.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1115

Abstract: A combination of the glucose oxidase - diaminobenzidine (DAB) method and the DAB-nickel method can successfully bring out details of immunoreactive structures in immunostained preparations. It is especially beneficial for visualizing fibers and terminals.

Addresses: Department of Neurobiology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an The People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Siyun Shua:

Gong Ju: Department of Neurobiology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an The People’s Republic of China, E-mail:

Lingzhi Fan:

Reprint Address: Gong Ju, Department of Neurobiology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an The People’s Republic of China.

Web of Science Category: Neurosciences


Chung-Mau Lo

卢宠茂

 

Henry Ngan

 

 

Wai-Kuen Tso

 

 

Chi-Leung Liu

 

 

Chi-Ming Lam

 

Ronnie Tung-Ping Poon

潘冬平

Sheung-Tat Fan

范上达

 

John Wong

 

37.      Lo, C.M., Ngan, H., Tso, W.K., Liu, C.L., Lam, C.M., Poon, R.T.P., Fan, S.T. and Wong, J. (2002), Randomized controlled trial of transarterial lipiodol chemoembolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatology, 35 (5), 1164-1171.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1114

Abstract: This randomized, controlled trial assessed the efficacy of transarterial Lipiodol (Lipiodol Ultrafluide, Laboratoire Guerbet, Anlnay-Sous-Bois, France) chemoembolization in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. From March 1996 to October 1997, 80 out of 279 Asian patients with newly diagnosed unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma fulfilled the entry criteria and randomly were assigned to treatment with chemoembolization using a variable dose of an emulsion of cisplatin in Lipiodol and gelatin-sponge particles injected through the hepatic artery (chemoembolization group, 40 patients) or symptomatic treatment (control group, 40 patients). One patient assigned to the control group secondarily was excluded because of unrecognized systemic metastasis. Chemoembolization was repeated every 2 to 3 months unless there was evidence of contraindications or progressive disease. Survival was the main end point. The chemoembolization group received a total of 192 courses of chemoembolization with a median of 4.5 (range, 1-15) courses per patient. Chemoembolization resulted in a marked tumor response, and the actuarial survival was significantly better in the chemoembolization group (I year, 57%; 2 years, 31%; 3 years, 26%) than in the control group (1 year, 32%; 2 years, 31%; 3 years, 3%; P = .002). When adjustments for baseline variables that were prognostic on univariate analysis were made with a multivariate Cox model, the survival benefit of chemoembolization remained significant (relative risk of death, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.29-0-81; P = .006). Although death from liver failure was more frequent in patients who received chemoembolization, the liver functions of the survivors were not significantly different. In conclusion, in Asian patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, transarterial Lipiodol chemoembolization significantly improves survival and is an effective form of treatment.

Addresses:

University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Chung-Mau Lo:

Henry Ngan:

Wai-Kuen Tso:

Chi-Leung Liu:

Chi-Ming Lam:

Ronnie Tung-Ping Poon: Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: poontp@hku.hk

Sheung-Tat Fan: Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: stfan@hku.hk

John Wong:

Reprint Address: Chung-Mau Lo, Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hk

Web of Science Category: Gastroenterology & Hepatology


Chun-Hua Lu

卢春华

Huang-Hao Yang

杨黄浩

Chun-Ling Zhu

朱春玲

Xi Chen

陈曦

Guo-Nan Chen

陈国南

38.      Lu, C.H., Yang, H.H., Zhu, C.L., Chen, X. and Chen, G.N. (2009), A graphene platform for sensing biomolecules. Angewandte Chemie-International Edition, 48 (26), 4785-4787.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1113

Abstract:

Addresses:

The Key Lab of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety of the MOE, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, People’s Republic of China.

The First Institute of Oceanography, SOA, Qingdao, 266061, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Chun-Hua Lu: Fuzhou University, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: chunhualu@fzu.edu.cn

Huang-Hao Yang: Fuzhou University, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: hhyang@fzu.edu.cn

Chun-Ling Zhu: Fuzhou University, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: zclzhu@mail.ustc.edu.cn

Xi Chen: Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: xichen@xmu.edu.cn

Guo-Nan Chen: Fuzhou University, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: gnchen@fzu.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Huang-Hao Yang, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science (SYNL), Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, People’s Republic of China.

E-mail Addresses: hhyang@fio.org.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry


Yu-Guo Guo

郭玉国

Jin-Song Hu

胡劲松

Li-Jun Wan

万立骏院士

39.      Guo, Y.G., Hu, J.S. and Wan, L.J. (2008), Nanostructured materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices. Advanced Materials, 20 (15), 2878-2887.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1103

Abstract:

Addresses: Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190 People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Yu-Guo Guo: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Beijing, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: ygguo@iccas.ac.cn

Jin-Song Hu: Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructure and Nanotechnology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: hujs@iccas.ac.cn

Li-Jun Wan: E-mail: Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190 People’s Republic of China. wanlijun@iccas.ac.cn

Reprint Address: Li-Jun Wan, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190 People’s Republic of China, E-mail: wanlijun@iccas.ac.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Multidisciplinary Materials Science; Applied Physics; Condensed Matter Physics


Ji-Huan He

何吉欢

40.      He, J.H. (1999), Homotopy perturbation technique. Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 178 (3-4), 257-262.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1088

Abstract: The homotopy perturbation technique does not depend upon a small parameter in the equation. By the homotopy technique in topology, a homotopy is constructed with an imbedding parameter p epsilon [0, 1], which is considered as a “smalI parameter”. Some examples are given. The approximations obtained by the proposed method are uniformly valid not only for small parameters, but also for very large parameters. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.

Addresses:

Shanghai University, Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai 200072, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Ji-Huan He: Soochow University (PRC), National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: hejihuan@suda.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Ji-Huan He, Shanghai University, Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai 200072, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: glliu@yc.shu.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Engineering, Interdisciplinary Applications Mathematics, Mechanics


Qiong Wu

吴穹

Yuxi Xu

徐宇曦

 

Zhiyi Yao

姚志轶

 

Anran Liu

刘安然

Gaoquan Shi

石高全

41.      Wu, Q., Xu, Y.X., Yao, Z.Y., Liu, A.R. and Shi, G.Q. (2010), Supercapacitors based on flexible graphene/polyaniline nanofiber composite films. ACS NANO, 4 (4), 1963-1970.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1068

Abstract:

Addresses:

Department of Chemistry and Laboratory of Bio-organic Phosphorus, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Qiong Wu: Case Western Reserve University, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Yuxi Xu: Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: xuyuxi@fudan.edu.cn

Hua Bai: Xiamen University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China.E-mail: baihua@xmu.edu.cn

Zhiyi Yao:

Anran Liu:

Gaoquan Shi: Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: gshi@tsinghua.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Shi, GQ (reprint author), Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: gshi@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


 

Y.C. Kong

 

Dapeng Yu

俞大鹏

 

Bobby Zhang

 

Wei Fang

方伟

 

Shi-Qing Feng

 

42.      Kong, Y.C., Yu, D.P., Zhang, B., Fang, W. and Feng, S.Q. (2001), Ultraviolet-emitting ZnO nanowires synthesized by a physical vapor deposition approach. Applied Physics Letters, 78 (4), 407-409.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1059

Abstract: ZnO nanowires were mass produced using a physical vapor deposition approach. The ZnO nanowire monocrystallites have an average diameter around 60 nm and length up to a few micrometers. The unidirectional growth of the ZnO nanowires was controlled by the conventional vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Intensive UV light emission peaked around 3.27 eV was observed at room temperature, which was assigned to emission from free exciton under low excitation intensity. The observed room temperature UV emission was ascribed to the decrease in structure defects as compared to bulk ZnO materials, and in particularly to the size effect in the ZnO wires. (C) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

KeyWords Plus: Excitonic Stimulated-Emission; Room-Temperature

Addresses: Department of Physics, Mesoscopic Physics National Laboratory, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Y.C. Kong:

Dapeng Yu: Department of Physics, Mesoscopic Physics National Laboratory, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.cn

Bobby Zhang: University of Southern California, Department of Electrical Engineering, Los Angeles, California, United States

Wei Fang: Zhejiang University, Department of Optical Engineering, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: Email: wfang08@zju.edu.cn

Shi-Qing Feng:

Reprint Address: Yu, DP, Department of Physics, Mesoscopic Physics National Laboratory, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: yudp@pku.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Applied Physics


Likai Li

李力恺

 

Yijun Yu

 

 

Guo Jun Ye

 

 

Qingqin Ge

 

 

Xuedong Ou

 

 

Hua Wu

 

 

Donglai Feng

 

 

Xian Hui Chen

 

Yuanbo Zhang

张远波

 

 

 

43.      Li, L.K., Yu, Y.J., Ye, G.J., Ge, Q.Q., Ou, X.D., Wu, H., Feng, D.L., Chen, X.H. and Zhang, Y.B. (2014), Black phosphorus field-effect transistors. Nature Nanotechnology, 9 (5), 372-377.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1054

Abstract: Two-dimensional crystals have emerged as a class of materials that may impact future electronic technologies. Experimentally identifying and characterizing new functional two-dimensional materials is challenging, but also potentially rewarding. Here, we fabricate field-effect transistors based on few-layer black phosphorus crystals with thickness down to a few nanometres. Reliable transistor performance is achieved at room temperature in samples thinner than 7.5 nm, with drain current modulation on the order of 10(5) and well-developed current saturation in the I-V characteristics. The charge-carrier mobility is found to be thickness-dependent, with the highest values up to similar to 1,000 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) obtained for a thickness of similar to 10nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of black phosphorus thin crystals as a new two-dimensional material for applications in nanoelectronic devices.

Addresses:

State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, People’s Republic of China

Hefei National Laboratory for Physical

Science at Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Likai Li:

Yijun Yu:

Guo Jun Ye:

Qingqin Ge:

Xuedong Ou:

Hua Wu:

Donglai Feng:

Xian Hui Chen:

Yuanbo Zhang: Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: zhyb@fudan.edu.cn, yuanbo.zhang@gmail.com

Reprint Address: Likai Li (reprint author), State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Category: Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary


Jun Chen

陈军

 

Lina Xu

徐丽娜

Weiyang (Fiona) Li

李玮炀

Xinglong Gou

苟兴龙

44.      Chen, J., Xu, L.N., Li, W.Y. and Gou, X.L. (2005), a-Fe2O3 nanotubes in gas sensor and lithium-ion battery applications. Advanced Materials, 17 (5), 582-586.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1052

Abstract:

Addresses:

Institute of New Energy Materials Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Jun Chen: Institute of New Energy Materials Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: chenabc@nankai.edu.cn

Lina Xu:

Weiyang Li: Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, NH, USA. E-mail: weiyang.li@dartmouth.edu

Xinglong Gou: China West Normal University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: gouxlr@126.com

Reprint Address: Jun Chen, Institute of New Energy Materials Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: chenabc@nankai.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, Multidisciplinary Materials Science, Applied Physics, Condensed Matter Physics


Hui-Lin Guo

郭慧林

 

Xian-Fei Wang

 

 

Qing-Yun Qian

 

Feng-Bin Wang

王凤彬

Xing-Hua Xia

夏兴华

45.      Guo, H.L., Wang, X.F., Qian, Q.Y., Wang, F.B. and Xia, X.H. (2009), A green approach to the synthesis of graphene nanosheets. ACS NANO, 3 (9), 2653-2659.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1045

Abstract: Graphene can be viewed as an individual atomic plane extracted from graphite, as unrolled single-walled carbon nanotube or as an extended flat fullerene molecule. In this paper, a facile approach to the synthesis of high quality graphene nanosheets in large scale through electrochemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide precursor at cathodic potentials (completely reduced potential: -1.5 V) is reported. This method is green and fast, and will not result in contamination of the reduced material. The electrochemically reduced graphene nanosheets have been carefully characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques in comparison to the chemically reduced graphene-based product. Particularly, FTIR spectra indicate that a variety of the oxygen-containing functional groups have been thoroughly removed from the graphite oxide plane via electrochemical reduction. The chemically converted materials are not expected to exhibit graphene’s electronic properties because of residual defects. Indeed, the high quality grapheme accelerates the electron transfer rate in dopamine electrochemistry (Delta E(p) is as small as 44 mV which is much smaller than that on a glassy carbon electrode). This approach opens up the possibility for assembling graphene biocomposites for electrocatalysis and the construction of blosensors.

Addresses:

Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, People’s Republic of China

Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Hui-Lin Guo: Department of Chemistry, Northwest University, People’s Republic of China

Xian-Fei Wang:

Qing-Yun Qian:

Feng-Bin Wang: School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, People’s Republic of China.

Xing-Hua Xia: School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: xhxia@nju.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Xia, XH (reprint author), Nanjing Univ, Sch Chem & Chem Engn, Key Lab Analyt Chem Life Sci, Nanjing 210093, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: xhxia@nju.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Multidisciplinary Materials Science


Yong Yong Shi

师咏勇

Lin He

贺林院士

46.      Shi, Y.Y. and He, L. (2005), SHEsis, a powerful software platform for analyses of linkage disequilibrium, haplotype construction, and genetic association at polymorphism loci. Cell Research, 15 (2), 97-98.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1029

Abstract: In multiloci-based genetic association studies of complex diseases, a powerful and high efficient tool for analyses of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers, haplotype distributions and many chi-square/p values with a large number of samples has been sought for long. In order to achieve the goal of obtaining meaningful results directly from raw data, we developed a robust and user-friendly software platform with a series of tools for analysis in association study with high efficiency. The platform has been well evaluated by several sets of real data.

Addresses:

Bio-X Life Science Research Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

NHGG, Bio-X Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Yong Yong Shi: Bio-X Life Science Research Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: shiyongyong@gmail.com

Lin He: Bio-X Life Science Research Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: helin@sjtu.edu.cn

Reprint Address: He, L (reprint author), Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Bio X Ctr, NHGG, Hao Ran Bldg, 1954 Hua Shan Rd, Shanghai 200030, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: helin@nhgg.org

Web of Science Category: Cell Biology


Ji-Huan He

何吉欢

47.      He, J.H. (1999), Variational iteration method - a kind of non-linear analytical technique: Some examples. International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics, 34 (4), 699-708.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1028

Abstract: In this paper, a new kind of analytical technique for a non-linear problem called the variational iteration method is described and used to give approximate solutions for some well-known non-linear problems. In this method, the problems are initially approximated with possible unknowns. Then a correction functional is constructed by a general Lagrange multiplier, which can be identified optimally via the variational theory. Being different from the other non-linear analytical methods, such as perturbation methods, this method does not depend on small parameters, such that it can find wide application in non-linear problems without linearization or small perturbations. Comparison with Adomian’s decomposition method reveals that the approximate solutions obtained by the proposed method converge to its exact solution faster than those of Adomian’s method.

Addresses:

Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Ji-Huan He: Soochow University (PRC), National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: hejihuan@suda.edu.cn

Reprint Address: Ji-Huan He, Shanghai University, Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai 200072, People’s Republic of China

E-mail Addresses: glliu@yc.shu.edu.cn

Web of Science Category: Mechanics


 

Zhi-Xiang Shen

 

 

Guo-Qiang Chen

 

 

Jian-Hua Ni

 

 

Xiu-Shong Li

 

 

Shu-Min Xiong

 

 

Qian-Yao Qiu

 

 

Jun Zhu

 

 

Wei Tang

 

 

Guan-Lin Sun

 

 

Kan-Qi Yang

 

 

Yu Chen

 

 

Li Zhou

 

 

Zhi-Wen Fang

 

 

Yan-Ting Wang

 

 

Jun Ma

 

 

Peng Zhang

 

 

Ting-Dong Zhang

 

 

Sai-Juan Chen

 

 

Zhu Chen

 

 

Zhen-Yi Wang

 

48.      Shen, Z.X., Chen, G.Q., Ni, J.H., Li, X.S., Xiong, S.M., Qiu, Q.Y., Zhu, J., Tang, W., Sun, G.L., Yang, K.Q., Chen, Y., Zhou, L., Fang, Z.W., Wang, Y.T., Ma, J., Zhang, P., Zhang, T.D., Chen, S.J., Chen, Z. and Wang, Z.Y. (1997), Use of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APE). II. Clinical efficacy and pharmacokinetics in relapsed patients. Blood, 89 (9), 3354-3360.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1027

Abstract: The therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was evaluated among 15 APL patients at relapse after all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induced and chemotherapy maintained complete remission (CW). As2O3 was administered intravenously at the dose of 10 mg/d. Clinical CR was achieved in nine of 10 (90%) patients treated with As2O3 alone and in the remaining five patients treated by the combination of As2O3 and low-dose chemotherapeutic drugs or ATRA. During the treatment with As2O3, there was no bone marrow depression and only limited side effects were encountered. Pharmacokinetic studies, which were performed in eight patients, showed that after a peak level of 5.54 mu mol/L to 7.30 mu mol/L, plasma arsenic was rapidly eliminated, and the continuous administration of As2O3 did not alter its pharmacokinetic behaviors. In addition, increased amounts of arsenic appeared in the urine, with a daily excretion accounting for approximately 1% to 8% of the total daily dose administered. Arsenic contents in hair and nail were increased, and the peak content of arsenic could reach 2.5 to 2.7 mu g/g tissue at GR. On the other hand, a decline of the arsenic content in hair and nail was observed after withdrawal of the drug. We conclude that As2O3, treatment is an effective and relatively safe drug in APL patients refractory to ATRA and conventional chemotherapy.

Addresses:

Shanghai Med Univ 2, Shanghai Inst Hematol, Ruijin Hosp, Dept Hematol, Shanghai 200025, People’s Republic of China

Shanghai Med Univ 2, Renji Hosp, Shanghai 200025, People’s Republic of China

Harbin Municipal First Peoples Hosp, Harbin Inst Hematol, Harbin, People’s Republic of China

Harbin Med Coll, First Hosp, Dept Tradit Chinese Med, Harbin, People’s Republic of China

Present addresses:

Zhi-Xiang Shen:

Guo-Qiang Chen:

Jian-Hua Ni:

Xiu-Shong Li:

Shu-Min Xiong:

Qian-Yao Qiu:

Jun Zhu:

Wei Tang:

Guan-Lin Sun:

Kan-Qi Yang:

Yu Chen:

Li Zhou:

Zhi-Wen Fang:

Yan-Ting Wang:

Jun Ma:

Peng Zhang:

Ting-Dong Zhang:

Sai-Juan Chen:

Zhu Chen:

Zhen-Yi Wang

Reprint Address:

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Category: Hematology


 

Hong Deng

 

 

Xiaolin Li

李曉林

Qing Peng

彭卿

Xun Wang

王训

 

Jinping Chen

 

Yadong Li

李亚栋院士

49.      Deng, H., Li, X.L., Peng, Q., Wang, X., Chen, J.P. and Li, Y.D. (2005), Monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite microspheres. Angewandte Chemie-International Edition, 44 (18), 2782-2785.

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 1023

Abstract:

Addresses:

Department of Chemistry and the Key Laboratory of Atomic & Molecular Nanosciences (Ministry of Education, China), Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, People’s Republic of China.

National Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Beijing, 100084, People’s Republic of China.

Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100084, People’s Republic of China.

Present addresses:

Hong Deng:

Xiaolin Li:

Qing Peng: Tsinghua University, Department of Chemistry, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: pengqing@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Xun Wang: Tsinghua University