Trend Research Centre


1000 CLUB OF THE CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) --1900-present

There were 47,958,127 publications which included 33,217,553 articles in the SCI-EXPANDED from 1900

There were 811,760 publications which included 616,846 articles in the Web of Science category of the chemical engineering

50 articles in the Web of Science category of the chemical engineering have been cited at least 1000 times from Web of Science Core Collection.

Data last updated 02 March 2017

 

Figure 1. 1000 club of the chemical engineering by year

 

Figure 2. 1000 club of the chemical engineering by total citations

 

Figure 3. 1000 club of the chemical engineering by citations per year

 

Figure 4. 1000 club of the chemical engineering by total citations in 2016

 

Ding-Yu Peng

Donald B. Robinson (Deceased)

1.          Peng, D. and Robinson, D.B. (1976), A new two-Constant Equation of State. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Fundamentals, 15 (1), 59-64.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 5326

Addresses: University of Alberta, Department of Chemistry and Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Present addresses:

Ding-Yu Peng: University of Saskatchewan, College of Engineering, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9, Canada, E-mail: dingyu.peng@usask.ca

Reprint Address: Robinson, D.B., University of Alberta, Department of Chemistry and Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Industrial Engineering


Yuh-Shan Ho

Gordon McKay

2.          Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (1999), Pseudo-second order model for sorption processes. Process Biochemistry, 34 (5), 451-465.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 5144

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan, E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Web of Science Categories: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Chemical Engineering


Sabri Ergun

3.          Ergun, S. (1952), Fluid flow through packed columns. Chemical Engineering Progress, 48 (2), 89-94.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 3990

Addresses: Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Present addresses:

Reprint Address: Ergun, S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Henri Renon

John M. Prausnitz

4.          Renon, H. and Prausnitz, J.M. (1968), Local Compositions in Thermodynamic Excess Functions for Liquid Mixtures. AIChE Journal, 14 (1), 135-144.

Addresses: University of California, Berkeley, California, USA

Times Cited in Web of Science: 3952

Present addresses:

Henri Renon: Centre Réacteurs et Processus, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Paris, 60 Boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006 Paris, France

John M. Prausnitz: University of California, Berkeley, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, California, USA, E-mail: Prausnit@cchem.berkeley.edu

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Fabrizio Cavani

Ferruccio Trifirò

Angelo Vaccari

5.          Cavani, F., Trifirò, F. and Vaccari, A. (1991), Hydrotalcite-type anionic clays: Preparation, properties and applications. Catalysis Today, 11 (2), 173-301.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 3558

Addresses: University of Bologna, Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, Wale de1 Risorgimento 4,40136 BOLOGNA, Italy

Present addresses:

Fabrizio Cavani: University of Bologna, Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, Wale de1 Risorgimento 4,40136 BOLOGNA, Italy, E-mail: cavani@ms.fci.unibo.it

Ferruccio Trifirò: University of Bologna, Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, Wale de1 Risorgimento 4,40136 BOLOGNA, Italy, E-mail: ferruccio.trifiro@unibo.it

Angelo Vaccari: University of Bologna, Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, Wale de1 Risorgimento 4,40136 BOLOGNA, Italy, E-mail: angelo.vaccari@unibo.it

Reprint Address: Cavani, F (reprint author), Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, Wale de1 Risorgimento 4,40136 BOLOGNA, Italy

Web of Science Categories: Applied Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Giorgio Soave

6.          Soave, G. (1972), Equilibrium constants from a modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state. Chemical Engineering Science, 27 (6), 1197-1203.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 3223

Addresses: Snam Progetti, Div. Sviluppo, Milano, Italy

Present addresses:

Giorgio Soave: Special Process Dept., Snamprogetti S.p.A., S. Donato Milanese, Italy

Reprint Address: Soave, G., Snam Progetti, Div. Sviluppo, Milano, Italy

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


C.R. Wilke

Pin Chang

7.          Wilke, C.R. and Chang, P. (1955), Correlation of diffusion coefficients in dilute solutions. AIChE Journal, 1 (2), 264-270.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 3027

Addresses: University of California, Berkeley, California, USA

Present addresses:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Denis S. Abrams

John M. Prausnitz

8.          Abrams, D.S. and Prausnitz, J.M. (1975), Statistical thermodynamics of liquid-mixtures: New expression for excess Gibbs energy of partly or completely miscible systems. AIChE Journal, 21 (1), 116-128.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 3013

Addresses: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemical Engineering, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

Present addresses:

Denis S. Abrams:

John M. Prausnitz: University of California, Berkeley, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, California, USA, E-mail: Prausnit@cchem.berkeley.edu

Reprint Address: John M. Prausnitz, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemical Engineering, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Masatake Haruta

2012 Nobel Laureates Predictions

9.          Haruta, M. (1997), Size- and support-dependency in the catalysis of gold. Catalysis Today, 36 (1), 153-166.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 2956

Addresses: Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan; Kishida Chemicals Company, Ltd, Joshoji-machi, Kadoma 571, Japan; Research Development Corporation of Japan, Science Building, 5-2 Nagata-Cho 2-chome, Tokyo 100 Japan

Present addresses:

Masatake Haruta: Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan; E-mail: haruta-masatake@center.tmu.ac.jp

Reprint Address: Haruta, M (reprint author), Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan

Web of Science Categories: Applied Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Masatake Haruta

2012 Nobel Laureates Predictions

N. Yamada

T. Kobayashi

S. Iijima

10.      Haruta, M., Yamada, N., Kobayashi, T. and Iijima, S. (1989), Gold catalysts prepared by coprecipitation for low-temperature oxidation of hydrogen and of carbon-monoxide. Journal of Catalysis, 115 (2), 301-309.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 2256

Addresses: Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan; Kishida Chemicals Company, Ltd, Joshoji-machi, Kadoma 571, Japan; Research Development Corporation of Japan, Science Building, 5-2 Nagata-Cho 2-chome, Tokyo 100 Japan

Present addresses:

Masatake Haruta: Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan; E-mail: haruta-masatake@center.tmu.ac.jp

Yamada, N.:

Kobayashi, T.:

Iijima, S.:

Reprint Address: Haruta, M (reprint author), Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan

Web of Science Categories: Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


W.E. Ranz (Deceased)

William Ranz was a PhD student with Marshall and became Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Minnesota from 1958 to 2000. He died in 2009.

W.R. Marshall, Jr. (Deceased)

Professor Marshall began his career as a member of this department in 1947 and was Dean of the College of Engineering from 1971 to 1981. He then served as Director of the University-Industry Research Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison until his death in 1988.

11.      Ranz, W.E. and Marshall, W.R. (1952), Evaporation from drops. Part I. Chemical Engineering Progress, 48 (3), 141-146.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 2029

Addresses: University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Aage Fredenslund (Deceased)

Russell L. Jones

John M. Prausnitz

12.      Fredenslund, A., Jones, R.L. and Prausnitz, J.M. (1975), Group-contribution estimation of activity-coefficients in nonideal liquid-mixtures. AIChE Journal, 21 (6), 1086-1099.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1957

Address: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemical Engineering, Berkeley, CA 94720,USA

Present addresses:

Russell L. Jones:

John M. Prausnitz: University of California, Berkeley, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, California, USA, E-mail: Prausnit@cchem.berkeley.edu

Reprint Address: Prausnitz, J.M., University of California, Berkeley, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, California, USA, E-mail: Prausnit@cchem.berkeley.edu

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Klaus-Dieter Kreuer

13.      Kreuer, K.D. (2001), On the development of proton conducting polymer membranes for hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. Journal of Membrane Science, 185 (1), 29-39.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1911

Addresses: Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstr 1, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany

Present addresses:

Klaus-Dieter Kreuer: Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstr 1, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany; E-mail: kreuer@fkf.mpg.de

Reprint Address: Kreuer, KD (reprint author), Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstr 1, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany; E-mail: kreuer@chemix.mpi-stuttgart.mpg.de; kreuer@fkf.mpg.de

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Polymer Science


P.V. Danckwerts

14.      Danckwerts, P.V. (1953), Continuous flow systems: Distribution of residence times. Chemical Engineering Science, 2 (1), 1-13.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1781

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, England

Present addresses:

Reprint Address: Danckwerts, P.V., Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Pembroke St, Cambridge, CB2 3RA England, United Kingdom

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


D. Geldart

15.      Geldart, D. (1973), Types of gas fluidization. Powder Technology, 7 (5), 285-292.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1711

Addresses: University of Bradford, Postgraduate School of Powder Technology, Bradford, Yorkshire, England

Present addresses:

Geldart, D.:

Reprint Address: Geldart, D.: Postgraduate School of Powder Technology, University of Bradford, England, UK

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Masatake Haruta

2012 Nobel Laureates Predictions

Susumu Tsubota

Tetsuhiko Kobayashi

Hiroyuki Kageyama

Michel J. Genet

Bernard Delmon

16.      Haruta, M., Tsubota, S., Kobayashi, T., Kageyama, H., Genet, M.J. and Delmon, B. (1993), Low-temperature oxidation of Co over gold supported on TiO2, α-Fe2O3, and Co3O4. Journal of Catalysis, 144 (1), 175-192.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1689

Address: Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan; Université Catholique de Louvain, Group Physico-Chimie Minérale et de Catalyse, Place Croix du Sud I, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Present addresses:

Masatake Haruta: Masatake Haruta: Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan; E-mail: haruta-masatake@center.tmu.ac.jp

Susumu Tsubota:

Tetsuhiko Kobayashi:

Hiroyuki Kageyama:

Michel J. Genet: Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN), Surface Characterisation platform (SUCH): X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Division Bio & Soft Matter (BSMA) – Surfaces, Croix du Sud 1, bte L7.04.01 B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. E-mail: Michel.Genet@uclouvain.be

Bernard Delmon: Université catholique de Louvain, Unité CATA, Place Croix du Sud 2, Boîte 7.05.17 B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve Belgium. E-mail: bernard.delmon@uclouvain.be

Reprint Address: Haruta, M., Government Industrial Research Institute of Osaka, Midorigaoka I, Ikeda 563, Japan

Web of Science Categories: Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


V. Gnielinski

17.      Gnielinski, V. (1976), New equations for heat and mass-transfer in turbulent pipe and channel flow. International Chemical Engineering, 16 (2), 359-368.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1675

Addresses:

Present addresses:

Reprint Address: Univ Karlsruhe, Lehrstuhl & Inst Therm Verfahrenstech, Karlsruhe, Bundes Republik

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering


Yuh-Shan Ho

Gordon McKay

18.      Ho, Y.S. and McKay, G. (1998), Sorption of dye from aqueous solution by peat. Chemical Engineering Journal, 70 (2), 115-124.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1670

Addresses: Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China

Present addresses:

Yuh-Shan Ho: Asia University, Water Research Centre, Taichung 41354, Taiwan, E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

Gordon McKay: Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Sustainable Development, College of Science & Engineering, E-mail: gmckay@qf.org.qa

Reprint Address: McKay, G, Hong Kong University Science & Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Hong Kong, People’s R China.

Web of Science Categories: Environmental Engineering; Chemical Engineering


R.W. Lockhart

R.C. Martinelli

19.      Lockhart, R.W. and Martinelli, R.C. (1949), Proposed correlation of data for isothermal two-phase, two-component flow in pipes. Chemical Engineering Progress, 45 (1), 39-48.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1660

Addresses: University of California, Berkeley, California, USA

Present addresses:

Lockhart, R.W.:

Martinelli, R.C.:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


A.L. Myers

John M. Prausnitz

20.      Myers, A.L. and Prausnitz, J.M. (1965), Thermodynamics of mixed-gas adsorption. AIChE Journal, 11 (1), 121-127.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1583

Present addresses:

Myers, A.L.:

John M. Prausnitz: University of California, Berkeley, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, California, USA, E-mail: Prausnit@cchem.berkeley.edu

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering


B.C. Lippens

J.H. Deboer

21.      Lippens, B.C. and Deboer, J.H. (1965), Studies on pore systems in catalysts .V. T Method. Journal of Catalysis, 4 (3), 319-323.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1549

Addresses: Department of Chemical Technology, Technological University of Delft, The Netherlands

Present addresses:

Lippens, B.C.:

Deboer, J.H.:

Reprint Address: Lippens, B.C., the Department of Chemical Technology, Technological University of Delft, The Netherlands

Web of Science Categories: Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Kenneth R. Hall

Lee C. Eagleton

Andreas Acrivos

Theodore Vermeulen

22.      Hall, K.R., Eagleton, L.C., Acrivos, A. and Vermeulen, T. (1966), Pore- and solid-diffuion kinetics in fixed-bed adsorption under constant-pattern conditions. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Fundamentals, 5 (2), 212-223.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1529

KeyWords Plus:

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA

Present addresses:

Kenneth R. Hall: Texas A&M University, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, TX 77843 USA, E-mail: krhall@tamu.edu

Lee C. Eagleton:

Andreas Acrivos:

Theodore Vermeulen:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering; Industrial Engineering


H.C. Brinkman

23.      Brinkman, H.C. (1947), A calculation of the viscous force exerted by a flowing fluid on a dense swarm of particles. Applied Scientific Research Section A-Mechanics Heat Chemical Engineering Mathematical Methods, 1 (1), 27-34.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1524

Address: Laboratory N.V. De Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij, Amsterdam, Northlands

Present addresses:

Brinkman, H.C.:

Reprint Address: Brinkman, H.C. Laboratory N.V. De Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij, Amsterdam, Northlands

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Mechanics; Multidisciplinary Physics


Kenneth Seddon

24.      Seddon, K.R. (1997), Ionic liquids for clean technology. Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, 68 (4), 351-356.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1489

Addresses: School of Chemistry, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK

Present addresses:

Kenneth Seddon: School of Chemistry, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK E-mail: k.seddon@qub.ac.uk

Reprint Address: School of Chemistry, The QueenÏs University of Belfast, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK

Web of Science Categories: Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Craig S. Turchi

David F. Ollis

25.      Turchi, C.S. and Ollis, D.F. (1990), Photocatalytic degradation of organic-water contaminants: Mechanisms involving hydroxyl radical attack. Journal of Catalysis, 122 (1), 178-192.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1444

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905, USA

Present addresses:

Craig S. Turchi: Concentrating Solar Power Program, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, CO 80401, USA. E-mail: craig.turchi@nrel.gov

David F. Ollis: Department of Chemical & biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905, USA, E-mail: ollis@eos.ncsu.edu

Reprint Address: Turchi, CS (reprint author), Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905, USA

Web of Science Categories: Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Lloyd M. Robeson

26.      Robeson, L.M. (1991), Correlation of separation factor versus permeability for polymeric membranes. Journal of Membrane Science, 62 (2), 165-185.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1417

Addresses: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA 18195, USA

Present addresses:

Lloyd M. Robeson: Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA.

Reprint Address: Lloyd M. Robeson, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA 18195, USA.

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Haiping Yang

Rong Yan

Hanping Chen

Dong Ho Lee

Chuguang Zheng

27.      Yang, H.P., Yan, R., Chen, H.P., Lee, D.H. and Zheng, C.G. (2007), Characteristics of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin pyrolysis. Fuel, 86 (12-13), 1781-1788.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1386

Abstract: The pyrolysis characteristics of three main components (hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) of biomass were investigated using, respectively, a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) detector and a pack bed. The releasing of main gas products from biomass pyrolysis in TGA was on-line measured using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In thermal analysis, the pyrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose occurred quickly, with the weight loss of hemicellulose mainly happened at 220-315 degrees C and that of cellulose at 315-400 degrees C. However, lignin was more difficult to decompose, as its weight loss happened in a wide temperature range (from 160 to 900 degrees C) and the generated solid residue was very high (similar to 40 wt.%). From the viewpoint of energy consumption in the course of pyrolysis, cellulose behaved differently from hemicellulose and lignin; the pyrolysis of the former was endothermic while that of the latter was exothermic. The main gas products from pyrolyzing the three components were similar, including CO2, CO, CH4 and some organics. The releasing behaviors of H-2 and the total gas yield were measured using Micro-GC when pyrolyzing the three components in a packed bed. It was observed that hemicellulose had higher CO2 yield, cellulose generated higher CO yield, and lignin owned higher H-2 and CH4 yield. A better understanding to the gas products releasing from biomass pyrolysis could be achieved based on this in-depth investigation on three main biomass components. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses:

National Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, PR China

Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Innovation Center, Block 2, Unit 237, 18 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637723, Singapore

Present addresses:

Haiping Yang: Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Wuhan, Hubei, China

Rong Yan: Nanyang Technological University, Tumasik, Singapore

Hanping Chen: Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wu-han-shih, Hubei, China, E-mail: hp.chen@163.com

Dong Ho Lee: Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore

Chuguang Zheng: Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wu-han-shih, Hubei, China

Reprint Address: Haiping Yang (reprint author), National Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, PR China, E-mail: yhping2002@163.com

Web of Science Category: Energy & Fuels; Chemical Engineering


E.P. Parry

28.      Parry, E.P. (1963), An infrared study of pyridine adsorbed on acidic solids characterization of surface acidity. Journal of Catalysis, 2 (5), 371-379.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1381

Addresses: Union Oil Company of California, Union Research Center, Brea, California, USA

Present addresses:

Parry, E.P.:

Reprint Address: Parry, E.P., Union Oil Company of California, Union Research Center, Brea, California, USA

Web of Science Categories: Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


H.C. Yao

Y.F.Y. Yao

29.      Yao, H.C. and Yao, Y.F.Y. (1984), Ceria in automotive exhaust catalysts. I. Oxygen storage. Journal of Catalysis, 86 (2), 254-265.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1336

Addresses: Ford Motor Company, P.O. Box 2053, Dearborn, Michigan 48121, USA

Reprint Address: YAO, HC, Ford Motor Company, P.O. Box 2053, Dearborn, Michigan 48121, USA

Web of Science Category: Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Ralph Higbie

30.      Higbie, R. (1935), The rate of absorption of a pure gas into a still liquid during short periods of exposure. Transactions of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 31, 365-389.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1314

Addresses: University of Michigan, USA

Reprint Address: Higbie, R.

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


J.J. Van Deemter

F.J. Zuiderweg

A. Klinkenberg

31.      Van Deemter, J.J., Zuiderweg, F.J. and Klinkenberg, A. (1956), Longitudinal diffusion and resistance to mass transfer as causes of nonideality in chromatography. Chemical Engineering Science, 5 (6), 271-289.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1291

Addresses: Shell-Laboratorium, Amsterdam (N.V. De Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij), Amsterdam, Northlands; N.V. De Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij, the Hagus, Northlands

Present addresses:

Vandeemter, J.J.:

Zuiderweg, F.J.:

Klinkenberg, A.:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Lloyd M. Robeson

32.      Robeson, L.M. (2008), The upper bound revisited. Journal of Membrane Science, 320 (1-2), 390-400.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1259

Abstract: The empirical upper bound relationship for membrane separation of gases initially published in 1991 has been reviewed with the myriad of data now presently available. The upper bound correlation follows the relationship P-i = ka(ij)(n), where P-i is the permeability of the fast gas, alpha(ij) (P-i/P-j) is the separation factor, k is referred to as the “front factor” and n is the slope of the log-log plot of the noted relationship. Below this line on a plot of log aij versus log P-i, virtually all the experimental data points exist. In spite of the intense investigation resulting in a much larger clataset than the original correlation, the upper bound position has had only minor shifts in position for many gas pairs. Where more significant shifts are observed, they are almost exclusively due to data now in the literature on a series of perfluorinated polymers and involve many of the gas pairs comprising He. The shift observed is primarily due to a change in the front factor, k, whereas the slope of the resultant upper bound relationship remains similar to the prior data correlations. This indicates a different solubility selectivity relationship for perfluorinated polymers compared to hydrocarbon/aromatic polymers as has been noted in the literature. Two additional upper bound relationships are included in this analysis; CO2/N-2 and N-2/CH4. In addition to the perfluorinated polymers resulting in significant upper bound shifts, minor shifts were observed primarily due to polymers exhibiting rigid, glassy structures including ladder-type polymers. The upper bound correlation can be used to qualitatively determine where the permeability process changes from solution-diffusion to Knudsen diffusion. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Lehigh University, 1801 Mill Creek Road, Macungie, PA 18062, USA

Present addresses:

Lloyd M. Robeson: Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA.

Reprint Address: Lloyd M. Robeson, Lehigh University, 1801 Mill Creek Road, Macungie, PA 18062, USA.

E-mail Addresses: lesrob2@verizon.net

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering, Polymer Science


Geza Horváth

Kunitaro Kawazoe

33.      Horváth, G. and Kawazoe, K. (1983), Method for the calculation of effective pore-size distribution in molecular-sieve carbon. Journal of Chemical Engineering of Japan, 16 (6), 470-475.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1259

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113, Japan

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering


Jean-Marie Herrmann

34.      Herrmann, J.M. (1999), Heterogeneous photocatalysis: fundamentals and applications to the removal of various types of aqueous pollutants. Catalysis Today, 53 (1), 115-129.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1238

Abstract: Photocatalysis is based on the double aptitude of the photocatalyst (essentially titania) to simultaneously adsorb both reactants and to absorb efficient photons. The basic fundamental principles are described as well as the influence of the main parameters governing the kinetics (mass of catalyst, wavelength, initial concentration, temperature and radiant flux). Besides the selective mild oxidation of organics performed in gas or liquid organic phase, W-irradiated titania becomes a total oxidation catalyst once in water because of the photogeneration of OH. radicals by neutralization of OH- surface groups by positive photo-holes. A large variety of organics could be totally degraded and mineralized into CO2 and harmless inorganic anions, Any attempt of improving titania’s photoactivity by noble metal deposition or ion-doping was detrimental. In parallel, heavy toxic metal ions (Hg2+, Ag+, noble metals) can be removed from water by photodeposition on titania. Several water-detoxification photocatalytic devices have already been commercialized. Solar platforms are working with large-scale pilot photoreactors, in which are degraded pollutants with quantum yields comparable to those determined in the laboratory with artificial light. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Photocatalyse, Catalyse et Environnement, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, BP 163, 69131 Ecully-Cedex, France

Present addresses:

Jean-Marie Herrmann: French National Centre for Scientific Research, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l`environment de Lyon (IRCELYON) Paris, France

Reprint Address: Herrmann, JM (reprint author), Photocatalyse, Catalyse et Environnement, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, BP 163, 69131 Ecully-Cedex, France. E-mail: jean-marie.herrmann@ec-lyon.fr

Web of Science Category: Applied Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


W.E. Ranz (Deceased)

William Ranz was a PhD student with Marshall and became Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Minnesota from 1958 to 2000. He died in 2009.

W.R. Marshall, Jr. (Deceased)

Professor Marshall began his career as a member of this department in 1947 and was Dean of the College of Engineering from 1971 to 1981. He then served as Director of the University-Industry Research Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison until his death in 1988.

35.      Ranz, W.E. and Marshall, Jr., W.R. (1952), Evaporation from drops. Part II. Chemical Engineering Progress, 48 (4), 173-180.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1232

Addresses:

Present addresses:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering


Yemada Taitel

A.E. Dukler

36.      Taitel, Y. and Dukler, A.E. (1976), Model for predicting flow regime transitions in horizontal and near horizontal gas-liquid flow. AIChE Journal, 22 (1), 47-55.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1200

Abstract: Models are presented for determining flow regime transitions in twophase gasliquid flow. The mechanisms for transition are based on physical concepts and are fully predictive in that no flow regime transitions are used in their development. A generalized flow regime map based on this theory is presented.

Addresses: Deportment of Chemical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004

Present addresses:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


J.O. Hinze

37.      Hinze, J.O. (1955), Fundamentals of the hydrodynamic mechanism of splitting in dispersion processes. AIChE Journal, 1 (3), 289-295.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1187

Addresses: Royal Dutch Shell-Laboratory, Delft, Holland

Present addresses:

Reprint Address: Hinze, J.O., Royal Dutch Shell-Laboratory, Delft, Holland.

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


J. George Hayden

John P. O’Connell

38.      Hayden, J.G. and O’Connell, J.P. (1975), Generalized method for predicting 2nd virial-coefficients. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Process Design and Development, 14 (3), 209-216.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1185

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida 32611, USA

Present addresses:

J. George Hayden

John P. O’Connell

Reprint Address: O’Connell, J.P. (reprint author), Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida 32611, USA

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Industrial Engineering


Joachim Gross

Gabriele Sadowski

39.      Gross, J. and Sadowski, G. (2001), Perturbed-chain SAFT: An equation of state based on a perturbation theory for chain molecules. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 40 (4), 1244-1260.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1150

Abstract: A modified SAFT equation of state is developed by applying the perturbation theory of Barker and Henderson to a hard-chain reference fluid. With conventional one-fluid mixing rules, the equation of state is applicable to mixtures of small spherical molecules such as gases, nonspherical solvents, and chainlike polymers. The three pure-component parameters required for nonassociating molecules were identified for 78 substances by correlating vapor pressures and Liquid volumes. The equation of state gives good fits to these properties and agrees well with caloric properties. When applied to vapor-liquid equilibria of mixtures, the equation of state shows substantial predictive capabilities and good precision for correlating mixtures. Comparisons to the SAFT version of Huang and Radosz reveal a clear improvement of the proposed model. A brief comparison with the Peng-Robinson model is also given for vapor-liquid equilibria of binary systems, confirming the good performance of the suggested equation of state. The applicability of the proposed model to polymer systems was demonstrated for high-pressure liquid-liquid equilibria of a polyethylene mixture. The pure-component parameters of polyethylene were obtained by extrapolating pure-component parameters of the n-alkane series to high molecular weights.

Addresses: Lehrstuhl fur Thermodynamik, Universitat Dortmund, Emil-Figge-Strasse 70, 44227 Dortmund, Germany

Present addresses:

Joachim Gross: Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering, Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. E-mail: gross@itt.uni-stuttgart.de

Gabriele Sadowski: Technische Universität Dortmund, Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Reprint Address: Gabriele Sadowski, Lehrstuhl fur Thermodynamik, Universitat Dortmund, Emil-Figge-Strasse 70, 44227 Dortmund, Germany

E-mail Addresses: G.Sadowski@ct.uni-dortmund.de

Web of Science Categories: Energy & Fuels, Chemical Engineering


Stefan Czernik

Anthony Bridgwater

40.      Czernik, S. and Bridgwater, A.V. (2004), Overview of applications of biomass fast pyrolysis oil. Energy Sources, 18 (2), 590-598.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1144

Abstract: Fast pyrolysis of biomass is one of the most recent renewable energy processes to have been introduced. It offers the advantages of a liquid product, bio-oil that can be readily stored and transported. Bio-oil is a renewable liquid fuel and can also be used for production of chemicals. Fast pyrolysis has now achieved a commercial success for production of chemicals and is being actively developed for producing liquid fuels. Bio-oils have been successfully tested in engines, turbines, and boilers, and have been upgraded to high-quality hydrocarbon fuels, although at a presently unacceptable energetic and financial cost. The paper critically reviews scientific and technical developments in applications of bio-oil to date and concludes with some suggestions for research and strategic developments.

Addresses: National Bioenergy Center NREL, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA.

Bio-Energy Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK.

Present addresses:

Stefan Czernik: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Colorado, USA.

Anthony Bridgwater: European Bioenergy Research Institute, Aston University, UK. E-mail: a.v.bridgwater@aston.ac.uk

Reprint Address: Stefan Czernik, National Bioenergy Center NREL, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA.

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Categories: Energy & Fuels, Chemical Engineering


Walter G. Chapman

Keith E. Gubbins

George Jackson

Maciej Radosz

41.      Chapman, W.G., Gubbins, K.E., Jackson, G. and Radosz, M. (1990), New reference equation of state for associating liquids. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 29 (8), 1709-1721.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1137

Abstract: An equation of state for associating liquids is presented as a sum of three Helmholtz energy terms: Lennard-Lones (LJ) segment (temperature-dependent hard sphere + dispersion), chain (increment due to chain formation), and association (increment due to association). This equation of state has been developed by extending Wertheim’s theory obtained from a resummed cluster expansion. Pure component molecules are characterized by segment diameter, segment-segment interaction energy, for example, Lennard-Jones u and E, and chain length expressed as the number of segments. There are also two association parameters, the association energy and volume, characteristic of each site-site pair. The agreement with molecular simulation data is shown to be excellent at all the stages of development for associating spheres, mixtures of associating spheres, and nonassociating chains. The model has been shown to reproduce experimental phase equilibrium data for a few selected real pure compounds.

Addresses:

School of Chemical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853

Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, New Jersey 08801

Present addresses:

Reprint Address:

Walter G. Chapman: Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, TX, USA. E-mail: wgchap@rice.edu

Keith E. Gubbins: Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, USA. E-mail: keg@ncsu.edu

George Jackson: Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. E-mail:

Maciej Radosz: Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, USA. E-mail: radosz@uwyo.edu

Web of Science Category: Chemical Engineering


George S. Kell

42.      Kell, G.S. (1975), Density, thermal expansivity, and compressibility of liquid water from 0° to 150°: Correlations and tables for atmospheric-pressure and saturation reviewed and expressed on 1968 temperature scale. Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, 20 (1), 97-105.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1117

Abstract: A review is given of the temperature dependence of the density of liquid water from 40° to 150°C. The inclusion of new literature data indicates that most previous correlations have been 10 ppm low at 70-80°C. An expression is derived, Equation 16, expressed on the IPTS-68 and valid from 0° to 150°C, that is in improved agreement with most data sets. Recent literature values of the velocity of sound permit the calculation of more reliable isothermal compressibilities. The errors of these compressibilities; from velocity of sound, density, thermal expansivity, and specific heat, are examined, and the error in the calculated compressibilities is estimated as 0.3´10-9bar-1 at 4°C and as 7´10-9bar-1 at 100°C. This paper supersedes two papers previously given by the same author.

Addresses: Division of Chemistry, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ont., Canada K I A OR9

Present addresses:

Reprint Address:

Web of Science Category: Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


J.G. Wijmans

R.W. Baker

43.      Wijmans, J.G. and Baker, R.W. (1995), The solution-diffusion model: A Review. Journal of Membrane Science, 107 (1-2), 1-21.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1108

Abstract: The solution-diffusion model has emerged over the past 20 years as the most widely accepted explanation of transport in dialysis, reverse osmosis, gas permeation, and pervaporation. Tn this paper we win derive the phenomenological equations for transport in these processes using the solution-diffusion model and starting from the fundamental statement that flux is proportional to a gradient in chemical potential. The direct and indirect evidence for the model’s validity will then br presented, together with a brief discussion of the transition between a solution-diffusion membrane and a pore-flow membrane seen in nanofiltration membranes and some gas permeation membranes.

Addresses: Membrane Technol & Res Inc, Menlo PK, CA 94025, USA

Present addresses:

J.G. Wijmans: Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Ньюарк, California, USA

R.W. Baker:

Reprint Address: R.W. Baker, Membrane Technol & Res Inc, Menlo PK, CA 94025, USA

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Polymer Science


Chunshan Song

44.      Song, C.S. (2003), An overview of new approaches to deep desulfurization for ultra-clean gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. Catalysis Today, 86 (1-4), 211-263.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1094

Abstract: This review discusses the problems of sulfur reduction in highway and non-road fuels and presents an overview of new approaches and emerging technologies for ultra-deep desulfurization of refinery streams for ultra-clean (ultra-low-sulfur) gasoline, diesel fuels and jet fuels. The issues of gasoline and diesel deep desulfurization are becoming more serious because the crude oils refined in the US are getting higher in sulfur contents and heavier in density, while the regulated sulfur limits are becoming lower and lower. Current gasoline desulfurization problem is dominated by the issues of sulfur removal from FCC naphtha, which contributes about 35% of gasoline pool but over 90% of sulfur in gasoline. Deep reduction of gasoline sulfur (from 330 to 30 ppm) must be made without decreasing octane number or losing gasoline yield. The problem is complicated by the high olefins contents of FCC naphtha which contributes to octane number enhancement but can be saturated under HDS conditions. Deep reduction of diesel sulfur (from 500 to < 15 ppm sulfur) is dictated largely by 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, which represents the least reactive sulfur compounds that have substitutions on both 4- and 6-positions. The deep HDS problem of diesel streams is exacerbated by the inhibiting effects of co-existing polyaromatics and nitrogen compounds in the feed as well as H(2)S in the product. The approaches to deep desulfurization include catalysts and process developments for hydrodesulfurization (HDS), and adsorbents or reagents and methods for non-HDS-type processing schemes. The needs for dearomatization of diesel and jet fuels are also discussed along with some approaches. Overall, new and more effective approaches and continuing catalysis and processing research are needed for producing affordable ultra-clean (ultra-low-sulfur and low-aromatics) transportation fuels and non-road fuels, because meeting the new government sulfur regulations in 2006-2010 (15 ppm sulfur in highway diesel fuels by 2006 and non-road diesel fuels by 20 10; 30 ppm sulfur in gasoline by 2006) is only a milestone. Desulfurization research should also take into consideration of the fuel-cell fuel processing needs, which will have a more stringent requirement on desulfurization (e.g., < 1 ppm sulfur) than IC engines. The society at large is stepping on the road to zero sulfur fuel, so researchers should begin with the end in mind and try to develop long-term solutions. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Energy Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA

Present addresses:

Chunshan Song: Pennsylvania State University, Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, University Park, PA, USA. E-mail: csong@psu.edu

Reprint Address: Chunshan Song, Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Energy Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA

E-mail Addresses: csong@psu.edu

Web of Science Category: Applied Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Chemical Engineering


David B. Kittelson

45.      Kittelson, D.B. (1998), Engines and nanoparticles: A review. Journal of Aerosol Science, 29 (5-6), 575-588.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1066

Abstract: Most of the particle number emitted by engines is in the nanoparticle range, D-p < 50 nm, while most of the mass is in the accumulation mode, 50 nm < D-p < 1000 nm, range. Nanoparticles are typically hydrocarbons or sulfate and form by nucleation during dilution and cooling of the exhaust, while accumulation mode particles are mainly carbonaceous soot agglomerates formed directly by combustion. Emission standards on diesel engines have led to dramatic reductions in particle mass emitted. However, a new HEI study shows that some low-emission diesel engines emit much higher concentrations of nanoparticles than older designs and other low-emission designs. Many recent studies suggest that at similar mass concentrations; nanometer size particles are more dangerous than micron size particles. This has raised questions about whether nanoparticle (number based) emission standards should be imposed. Unlike mass, number is not conserved. It may change dramatically by nucleation and coagulation during dilution and sampling, making it very difficult to design a standard. Furthermore, if nanoparticles are a problem; spark ignition engines may also have to be controlled. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Addresses: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Present addresses:

David B. Kittelson: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA; E-mail: kitte001@umn.edu

Reprint Address: David B. Kittelson (reprint author), Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA; E-mail: kitte001@umn.edu

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Environmental Sciences; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences


Stanley H. Huang

Maciej Radosz

46.      Huang, S.H. and Radosz, M. (1990), Equation of state for small, large, polydisperse, and associating molecules. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 29 (11), 2284-2294.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1052

Abstract:

Addresses: Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale. New. Jersey 08801, USA.

Present addresses:

Stanley Huang: Chevron, San Ramon, USA

Maciej Radosz: University of Wyoming, College of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, Dept. 3295, 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071, USA. E-mail: Radosz@uwyo.edu

Reprint Address: Maciej Radosz, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale. New. Jersey 08801, USA.

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


Howard Brenner

47.      Brenner, H. (1961), The slow motion of a sphere through a viscous fluid towards a plane surface. Chemical Engineering Science, 16 (3-4), 242-251.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1047

Abstract: Bipolar co-ordinates are employed to obtain “exact” solutions of the equations of slow, viscous flow for the steady motion of a solid sphere towards or away from a plane surface of infinite extent. Two cases are considered: (i) the plane surface is rigid and fluid adheres to its surface; (ii) the plane is a free surface on which the tangential stresses vanish. Deformation of the surface in the latter case is neglected. Numerical results are provided for the corrections to Stokes' law necessitated by the presence of the plane boundary at a finite distance from the particle. Application of the results to end-effect correlations in the falling-ball viscometer are discussed.

Addresses: Department of Chemical Engineering, New York University, New York 53, New York, USA

Present addresses:

Howard Bkenner:

Reprint Address: Howard Bkenner, Department of Chemical Engineering, New York University, New York 53, New York, USA

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering


R.L. Hamilton

O.K. Crosser

48.      Hamilton, R.L. and Crosser, O.K. (1962), Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous two-component systems. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Fundamentals, 1 (3), 187-191.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1040

Abstract: The influence of included particle shape, composition, and pure component conductivity upon the thermal conductivity of heterogeneous two-component mixtures consisting of a continuous and a discontinuous phase was studied. Thermal conductivities were measure? for mixtures of balsa wood and aluminum particles as several shapes in rubber at selected compositions. Thermal conductivities for widely different heterogeneous two-component systems can be calculated accurately using an equation in which the empirical shape factor n depends on thermal conductivities of the phases and the included particle shape. The influence of particle shape on n can be accounted for using the sphericity of the particle.

Addresses: R.L. Hamilton: Celanese Carp. of America, Summit. S.J.

O.K. Crosser: Gniuerszty of Oklahoma, Varman, Okia.

Present addresses:

Reprint Address:

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Industrial Engineering


Clarence D. Chang

Anthony J. Silvestri

49.      Chang, C.D. and Silvestri, A.J. (1977), The conversion of methanol and other o-compounds to hydrocarbons over zeolite catalysts. Journal of Catalysis, 47 (2), 249-259.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1028

Abstract: The conversion of methanol and other O-compounds to CrClo hydrocarbons using a new class of shape-selective zeolites is reported. Methanol, dimethyl ether, or an equilibrium mixture thereof appears to be converted in a first reaction sequence to olefins predominantly in the C-G, range. In the final steps of the reaction path, the C&G, olefins are converted to paraffins, aromafics, cycloparaffins and Ce+ olefins. The final hydrocarbons are largely in the gasoline(C4-Cla) boiling range. The thermochemistry of the methanol to hydrocarbon reaction is described and possible reaction mechanisms are discussed.

Addresses: Central Research Division, Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA.

Present addresses:

Reprint Address:

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Categories: Physical Chemistry; Chemical Engineering


Barbara J. Turpin

Ho-Jin Lim

50.      Turpin, B.J. and Lim, H.J. (2001), Species contributions to PM2.5 mass concentrations: Revisiting common assumptions for estimating organic mass. Aerosol Science and Technology, 35 (1), 602-610.

Times Cited in Web of Science: 1018

Abstract: In virtually all published literature wherein closure between gravimetric and chemical measurements is tested, the concentration of particulate organics is estimated by multiplying the measured concentration of organic carbon (micrograms carbon/cubic meter air) by a factor of 1.2-1.4. This factor, which is an estimate of the average molecular weight per carbon weight for the organic aerosol, stems from very limited theoretical and laboratory studies conducted during the 1970s. This investigation suggests that 1.4 is the lowest reasonable estimate for the organic molecular weight per carbon weight for an urban aerosol and that 1.4 does not accurately represent the average organic molecular weight per carbon weight for a nonurban aerosol. Based on the current evaluation, ratios of 1.6 +/- 0.2 for urban aerosols and 2.1 +/- 0.2 for nonurban aerosols appear to be more accurate. Measurements are recommended. Literature values also suggest that 1.2 g/cm(3) is a reasonable estimate for the organic aerosol density. This quantity is needed to convert between geometric and aerodynamic size distributions (e.g., to predict aerosol optical properties and understand cloud nucleating properties).

Addresses: Rutgers University, Department of Environmental Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA; Rutgers University, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA

Present addresses:

Barbara J. Turpin: Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Environmental Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 140 Rosenau Hall CB #7400, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA. E-mail: esechair@unc.edu

Ho-Jin Lim: Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University. E-mail: hjlim@knu.ac.kr

Reprint Address: Barbara J. Turpin: Rutgers University, Department of Environmental Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA

E-mail Addresses:

Web of Science Categories: Chemical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Environmental Sciences; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences

 

Table 1. Authors

Author

Total articles (TC ³ 1000)

First author articles

Prausnitz, JM

4

0

Haruta, M

3

3

Ho, YS

2

2

Ranz, WE

2

2

Robeson, LM

2

2

Kobayashi, T

2

0

Marshall, WR

2

0

McKay, G

2

0

Radosz, M

2

0

Abrams, DS

1

1

Brenner, H

1

1

Brinkman, HC

1

1

Cavani, F

1

1

Chang, CD

1

1

Chapman, WG

1

1

Czernik, S

1

1

Danckwerts, PV

1

1

Ergun, S

1

1

Fredenslund, A

1

1

Geldart, D

1

1

Gnielinski, V

1

1

Gross, J

1

1

Hall, KR

1

1

Hamilton, RL

1

1

Hayden, JG

1

1

Herrmann, JM

1

1

Higbie, R

1

1

Hinze, JO

1

1

Horvath, G

1

1

Huang, SH

1

1

Kell, GS

1

1

Kittelson, DB

1

1

Kreuer, KD

1

1

Lippens, BC

1

1

Lockhart, RW

1

1

Myers, AL

1

1

Parry, EP

1

1

Peng, D

1

1

Renon, H

1

1

Seddon, KR

1

1

Soave, G

1

1

Song, CS

1

1

Taitel, Y

1

1

Turchi, CS

1

1

Turpin, BJ

1

1

Vandeemter, JJ

1

1

Wijmans, JG

1

1

Wilke, CR

1

1

Yang, HP

1

1

Yao, HC

1

1

Acrivos, A

1

0

Baker, RW

1

0

Bridgwater, AV

1

0

Chang, P

1

0

Chen, HP

1

0

Crosser, OK

1

0

Deboer, JH

1

0

Delmon, B

1

0

Dukler, AE

1

0

Eagleton, LC

1

0

Genet, MJ

1

0

Gubbins, KE

1

0

Iijima, S

1

0

Jackson, G

1

0

Jones, RL

1

0

Kageyama, H

1

0

Kawazoe, K

1

0

Klinkenberg, A

1

0

Lee, DH

1

0

Lim, HJ

1

0

Martinelli, RC

1

0

Oconnell, JP

1

0

Ollis, DF

1

0

Robinson, DB

1

0

Sadowski, G

1

0

Silvestri, AJ

1

0

Trifiro, F

1

0

Tsubota, S

1

0

Vaccari, A

1

0

Vermeulen, T

1

0

Yamada, N

1

0

Yan, R

1

0

Yao, YFY

1

0

Zheng, CG

1

0

Zuiderweg, FJ

1

0